December 11, 2019

Archives for March 2013

Clay County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Clay County Iowa 4-H

Bonnie Dalager (left), Clay County Extension & Outreach program director and Anissa Jepsen, youth and 4-H program director accept a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership.

MaxYield Cooperative presented Clay County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and our commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed over $2800 to Clay County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $15,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in northern Iowa, southern Minnesota and Riga, Michigan. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCooperative.com.

More information about Clay County Extension & Outreach is available here.

 

CME Group Announces Reduced Grain & Oilseed Trading Hours

Effective Sunday, April 7th (trade date Monday, April 8), all CBOT, KCBT, and MGEX Grain and Oilseed Futures and Options will reduce electronic trading hours.

The trading hours for CBOT and KCBT will be:

Sunday-Friday: 7:00 p.m. to 7:45 a.m. CT

Monday – Friday: Break from 7:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. CT

Monday – Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. CT

U.S Seasonal Drought Outlook: March – June 30

droughtMaxYield Cooperative grain analyst Karl Setzer sends along NOAA’s most recent drought outlook map.

Improvement for Iowa and Minnesota is shown during the late March through June 30, 2013 time frame.

Small-Town Pride Thrives in Iowa

North Union Warriors in Pink

Members of the North Union High School girls’ basketball team. Back row, left to right: Shelby Luke, Peyton Oleson, Madison Bollig, Aurora Oliver, Jasmine Clausen, Dena Looft, Madison Irmiter, Front row, left to right: Sarah Rolling, Hanna Gardner, Collete Haag, Morgan Rahm, Jaycie Eaton and Cheyanne Boland.

For generations, small towns and small school districts have shaped the character of rural Iowa. Not only are schools the hub of the community, but they’re often a prime source of hometown pride.

At North Union High School, this pride was reflected in the pink uniforms worn by the varsity girls’ basketball team for their Pink Out game against Clay Central-Everly. While the Warriors typically sport their school colors of green and black, the community pulled together to purchase pink uniforms for the girls’ efforts to raise awareness—and money—for breast cancer research.

This community support is a big plus for North Union, which includes nearly 750 students in the district, said Matt Berninghaus, superintendent. “Research shows that four factors affect student achievement levels: smaller school size, smaller class size, challenging curriculum, and highly qualified teachers,” noted Berninghaus, who added there are about 220 North Union High School students. “Iowa’s rural schools offer many advantages to students and our local communities, including a safe, nurturing environment, appropriate curriculum, and many extracurricular activities.”

These students represent the future of Iowa, and MaxYield Cooperative is proud to support our local schools and to provide funding to help make the annual Pink Out game happen.

 

Leading & Learning: Barry Anderson Joins MaxYield’s Board

Barry Anderson MaxYield CooperativeServing is second nature for Barry Anderson, who is excited to begin his three-year term as MaxYield Cooperative’s newest board member.

“My father, Wendell, served on many boards, including the Dickens Elevator,” said Anderson, who raises hogs, cattle, and row crops near Greenville. “He taught me that whatever I do, I should try to stay positive and help people.”

Before Anderson attended his first MaxYield board meeting in December of 2012, CEO Keith Heim provided him with a detailed review of the cooperative’s financials and updated him on the company’s current projects. “This was helpful, because the size of MaxYield’s financials is a lot larger than anything I’ve dealt with before,” said Anderson, who has served as president of the Clay County Farm Bureau and is an active member of the Clay County Pork Producers Association.

Top reasons to serve on the board Serving on the MaxYield board is worthwhile for a number of reasons, said Anderson, who worked as a loan officer and bank branch manager with Norwest Financial and later with Associates Financial before returning home to farm in 1996. He noted the following:

• It’s important to see the big picture. Anderson, who represents members in MaxYield’s West Region, enjoys learning about the cooperative’s numerous locations. “You gain a lot of knowledge about how the cooperative works and how management decisions must be made to benefit the company as a whole.”

• Networking is an asset. Anderson enjoys collaborating with other farmers at MaxYield’s board meetings, where board members’ input is valued. “We cover a lot of different areas, and no one is afraid to speak his mind.”

• Leadership roles at MaxYield help support Iowa agriculture. A 2012 recipient of the Wergin Good Farm Neighbor Award, Anderson enjoys working with ag leaders and officials at the local and state levels. He’s also willing to educate the public and lawmakers about rural Iowa. “Agriculture is a huge part of life, and we need to tell the story.”

• Opportunities abound to help MaxYield thrive. There are many positive things going on at MaxYield in 2013, including construction on the new 22,000-ton fertilizer facility at Belmond, where the first fertilizer supplies will be delivered later this year. “We’re not just sitting on our laurels,” Anderson said. “We’re investing in our facilities and are evaluating ways to attract and retain top talent. We’re also assessing partnerships that MaxYield may want to form with other companies.”

• Service builds confidence. Anderson has long valued the way that cooperative members can voice their opinions and work together for the common good. He encourages others to consider running for the MaxYield board. “Serving on the board is a confidence builder. I look forward to working with other farmers and MaxYield’s team leaders as we look to the future.”

 

Editor’s note: Barry and his wife, Dana, are glad they’ve had the chance to raise their children (daughters Megan and Taylor and son Christopher) on the farm.

Preferred Stock Offering Meeting – West Bend

Reminder, the Preferred Stock Offering Informational meeting at West Bend will be held….

Tuesday, March 19 at 7:00 p.m. at the West Bend Country Club. Please note the change of venue…it is at the West Bend Country Club, south of town on Hwy 15.

Learn why this offering is a win for investors, our communities and for your cooperative.

MaxYield Cooperative has never been stronger. Join us to learn why this may a a good investment strategy for you and what this preferred stock offering will do for MaxYield and our communities.

More information is available at: www.MaxYieldCooperative.com/PreferredStock.

This is not an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy Class A preferred stock issued by MaxYield Cooperative. Offers are made only by disclosure statement and other offering materials. No commission or other compensation is being paid to brokers or sales agents related to this offering.

 

 

 

Grain Receiving Line in Brazil

brazil grain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brazil grain

Support Given to Emmet County 4-H

Emmet County IA 4-H

Britney Rosburg (left) program educator and Marcy Sander, county youth coordinator accept a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H enrollment in Emmet County.

MaxYield Cooperative announced recently that they are continuing their commitment to Emmet County 4-H members and clubs by decreasing the cost of enrollment in the youth program.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H clubs and our commitment to 4-H,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed $1850 to Emmet County Extension.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families in this area. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in northern Iowa, southern Minnesota and eastern Michigan. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCooperative.com.

 

Belmond Fertilizer Facility Taking Shape

MaxYield Belmond FertilizerProgress continues to be made on the construction of our $4.4 million dry fertilizer storage and blending facility south of Belmond.

Construction of the building started last summer.

The fertilizer plant will have storage for 22,425 tons of fertilizer.

Specifically it will include two 8,000-ton bins, two 3,000-ton bins and smaller bins for micro-nutrient storage.

Expected completion of the project is Fall 2013.

MaxYield anticipates holding an open house for our clients, member and the community this summer.

More information about seed and agronomy solutions from MaxYield at www.MaxYieldSeed.com.

Belmond Fertilizer

West Bend Preferred Stock Meeting RESCHEDULED…

The Preferred Stock Offering meeting at West Bend that was postponed this week due to weather has been rescheduled.

The West Bend Preferred Stock Offering Informational meeting has been rescheduled to:

 

Tuesday, March 19 at 7:00 p.m. at the West Bend Country Club