October 21, 2019

Archives for November 2015

Joe Anniss Inducted into Iowa Co-op Hall of Fame

Joe Anniss, joined by his wife Bev, was inducted into the Iowa Co-op Hall of Fame November 24.

Joe Anniss, joined by his wife Bev, was inducted into the Iowa Co-op Hall of Fame November 24.

Joe Anniss, former general manager of MaxYield Cooperative, was inducted into the Iowa Co-op Hall of Fame November 24th. The ceremony was held during the Iowa Institute for Cooperative’s annual meeting, in Ames, IA.

Anniss began his nine year career at MaxYield in 1998. During his tenure, he created a plan that brought stability, growth and an ambitious roadmap for the future to the cooperative. In addition to improved financial strength, Anniss is also remembered for the client-focused culture and vision he infused into the cooperative.

Prior to leading MaxYield, Anniss was senior vice president of feed and animal health operations for SF Services, a cooperative based in Little Rock, AR. He also served in the cooperative system as feed division sales manager for Farmland Industries and as feed sales specialist for Land O’Lakes, Inc.

“I’m extremely humbled by this award,” expressed Anniss. “I’ve always been honored to be a part of the cooperative system and work alongside the most outstanding managers and learn from great role models. This award is not just for me, but for all those that I’ve had the honor of working with in the cooperative system.”

While Anniss was at MaxYield, sales grew from $94 million in 1998 to $179 million in 2007. Retained savings for the cooperative grew from $1.1 million to $8.0 million during the same time period.

Today, Anniss is retired, living in Algona with his wife Bev.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local member-owned cooperative, headquartered in West Bend, IA. More information about the co-op can be found at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

“Tanks of Thanks” Presented to Brian Peck

DSC_0463 (1024x680)Brian Peck of Fostoria was recently presented with a $50 Cenex “Tanks of Thanks” gift card.

The Tanks of Thanks program rewards Cenex clients in local communities that go the extra mile with free fuel. Peck was nominated by MaxYield Cooperative, which owns and operates the Cenex convenience store in Fostoria.

Each month, 100 people win a $50 Tanks of Thanks gift card from Cenex. Nancy Beck of Fostoria Cenex presented the award.

“Brian is a loyal customer of our Cenex store and a great person,” said Beck. “He travels frequently for medical appointments, and with this award, we hope to help in a small way and make his trips a little easier.”

MaxYield Cooperative is a local, member-owned cooperative that operates Cenex convenience stores in West Bend, Whittemore, and Fostoria and also provides Cenex fuels to area farmers and clients.

More information about the MaxYield and the Tanks of Thanks program is available at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.Cenex.com/tanks-of-thanks.

“Tanks of Thanks” Presented to Mary Smith

Mary Smith of Fostoria was recently presented with a $50 Cenex “Tanks of Thanks” gift card.

The Tanks of Thanks program rewards Cenex clients in local communities that go the extra mile with free fuel. Smith was nominated by MaxYield Cooperative, which owns and operates the Cenex convenience store in Fostoria.

Each month, 100 people win a $50 Tanks of Thanks gift card from Cenex. Nancy Beck of Fostoria Cenex presented the award.

Smith, a special education teacher in Ruthven, was a key volunteer during the community’s centennial celebration. She took charge of much of the fundraising and went the extra mile to see that two new signs for the Fostoria community were installed.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local, member-owned cooperative that operates Cenex convenience stores in West Bend, Whittemore, and Fostoria and also provides Cenex fuels to area farmers and clients.

More information about the MaxYield and the Tanks of Thanks program is available at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.Cenex.com/tanks-of-thanks.

Palo Alto County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Julie Naig, left and Jody Leuer accept a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership in Palo Alto County.

Julie Naig, left and Jody Leuer accept a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership in Palo Alto County.

MaxYield Cooperative presented Palo Alto County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and our commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed nearly $1500 to Palo Alto County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in northern Iowa, southern Minnesota and Riga, Michigan. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCooperative.com and at www.FromTheField.com.

“Tanks of Thanks” Presented to Jerry Peterson

DSC_0465 (1024x680)Jerry Peterson of Fostoria was recently presented with a $50 Cenex “Tanks of Thanks” gift card.

The Tanks of Thanks program rewards Cenex clients in local communities that go the extra mile with free fuel. Peterson was nominated by MaxYield Cooperative, which owns and operates the Cenex convenience store in Fostoria.

Each month, 100 people win a $50 Tanks of Thanks gift card from Cenex. Nancy Beck of Fostoria Cenex presented the award.

Peterson is a local carpenter who is always willing to go the extra mile to help others. Though he was in a serious car accident earlier this year, he always has a smile on his face and makes sure that those around him do as well.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local, member-owned cooperative that operates Cenex convenience stores in West Bend, Whittemore, and Fostoria and also provides Cenex fuels to area farmers and clients.

More information about the MaxYield and the Tanks of Thanks program is available at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.Cenex.com/tanks-of-thanks.

Florence Kramer Earns “Tanks of Thanks”

DSC_0466 (1024x680)Florence Kramer of Fostoria was recently presented with a $50 Cenex “Tanks of Thanks” gift card.

The Tanks of Thanks program rewards Cenex clients in local communities that go the extra mile with free fuel. Kramer was nominated by MaxYield Cooperative, which owns and operates the Cenex convenience store in Fostoria.

Each month, 100 people win a $50 Tanks of Thanks gift card from Cenex. Nancy Beck of Fostoria Cenex presented the award.

Kramer is one of the backbones of the local church, says Beck. “She will do anything to help keep the small church going by organizing fundraisers, meals for funerals and running church errands.”

MaxYield Cooperative is a local, member-owned cooperative that operates Cenex convenience stores in West Bend, Whittemore, and Whittemore and also provides Cenex fuels to area farmers and clients.

More information about the MaxYield and the Tanks of Thanks program is available at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.Cenex.com/tanks-of-thanks.

MaxYield Decreases Cost Hancock County 4-H Membership

MaxYield Cooperative recently presented Hancock County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and our commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed over $1800 to Hancock County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

MaxYield Cooperative is a local farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in northern Iowa, and southern Minnesota. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCooperative.com.

Trampel Receives Honorary Chapter Farmer Award

20150728_maxyield_316 (681x1024)Ask Kody Trampel about his 2015 award from the Garner-Hayfield/Ventura FFA Chapter and he’ll say he’s helped out the chapter now and then. Ask Bob Baumgard about Trampel’s recent Honorary Chapter Farmer Award, however, and you’ll discover there’s a lot more to it.

“Kody is a great friend of FFA,” said Baumgard, Garner-Hayfield/Ventura FFA’s chapter advisor. “When I mentioned the Honorary Chapter Farmer Award to the members, Kody’s name came up immediately.”

Trampel, a MaxYield Cooperative agronomy specialist, has worked closely with the Garner-Hayfield/Ventura FFA on a 13-acre test plot near the school. In 2014, MaxYield provided soybean seed and custom spraying for the crop, along with agronomic advice throughout the growing season. Trampel has continued to assist students with the test plot and enjoys helping them learn more about crop and livestock production.

“Kody is a strong supporter of agriculture, and the students look up to him,” Baumgard noted.
This isn’t the first time Trampel has received an Honorary Chapter Farmer Award, which recognizes those who advance agricultural education and the FFA. The 2007 Belmond-Klemme High School graduate received the Honorary Chapter Farmer Award from the Belmond-Klemme FFA Chapter in 2014.

FFA has long been important to Trampel, who served as the Belmond-Klemme chapter vice president and attended both state and national FFA conventions. “FFA teaches leadership, builds your work ethic, and teaches you responsibility through Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAEs),” said Trampel, who has worked for MaxYield full time since 2012. “SAEs also give you the chance to work on different projects and expand your knowledge.”

These experiences not only sparked Trampel’s interest in studying agriculture in college, but continue to fuel his desire to advocate for agriculture. In addition to serving as a director on the Hancock County Farm Bureau Board, Trampel plays a key role with the Hancock County Ag Day Breakfast.

This attracts more than 350 people each spring and helps non-farm people learn more about modern agriculture. State legislators, bloggers, and members of the media are invited to the Ag Day Breakfast, a joint project of the Hancock County Farm Bureau and Garner Chamber of Commerce. Guest speakers at the popular event have included Trent Loos, a well-known ag advocate and radio personality.

“I want to help share the facts about agriculture, especially with the younger generation,” said Trampel, who is concerned about schools cutting their funding for ag education. “These are the consumers and voters of the future, and they need to be well informed about agriculture and food production.”

Educating others is a natural fit for someone who once thought about becoming an ag teacher. “It’s important to give the students real-world learning experiences,” Trampel said. “Many of the kids we meet through FFA will be working in agriculture someday. MaxYield wants to start building this relationship early.”

Never Forget: Kossuth County Freedom Rock Honors Veterans

20150727_maxyield_136 (1024x681)It’s all too easy to take for granted the people who most deserve our gratitude. That’s why Whittemore residents enlisted support throughout the community to create a Freedom Rock to honor military veterans.

“Many men and women have died for this country,” said Stu Simonson, senior vice president of Farmers State Bank in Whittemore and member of the American Legion’s Seely Walsh Post #425. “We wanted Kossuth County’s Freedom Rock to tell a story of sacrifice.”

This story is told through patriotic images ranging from the bald eagle to the American flag being raised at Iwo Jima, all painted by Iowa artist Ray “Bubba” Sorensen of Greenfield. While Sorensen completed the artwork just in time for the Fourth of July this summer, the process began two years earlier with the late Kathy Fraser, a former Whittemore deputy city clerk and city council member.

“Kathy was very passionate about Whittemore,” Simonson said. “When she heard about the plan to put a Freedom Rock in each of Iowa’s 99 counties, she said we had to have a Freedom Rock here.”

Timing was everything, since the Kossuth County town that sent its application first would receive a Freedom Rock. Whittemore community leaders submitted their request just in time in 2013, along with the $1,000 application fee. “From the application process to the final stages of the Freedom Rock project, this community has gone all out,” said Simonson, a Vietnam War combat veteran.

20150727_maxyield_144 (1024x681)Telling a story in stone
The community made plans to move a boulder into town after they were notified that Whittemore would be the home of the 30th Freedom Rock in Iowa. The perfect stone turned up on the Wirtz brothers’ farm near Rodman.

After the 6-foot-tall boulder was dragged from the field to the edge of the road, Tom Mader with Heartland Building Moving of West Bend worked with Aletha King of Cylinder and her son to haul the rock to Whittemore in August 2014. The 10-foot-diameter boulder was set on a concrete slab poured west of the Seely Walsh Post #425 American Legion Hall.

Next, Legion members and community leaders brainstormed concepts for the Freedom Rock’s artwork. “We had a list of about 24 ideas—way too many,” Simonson said. “We sent the list and a photo of the rock to Bubba, who helped us select which scenes would work best.”

Scenes that made the cut included:
• Marines raising the American flag at Iwo Jima for the front of the Freedom Rock.

• A bald eagle with the American flag in his beak, with the flag draped over both sides of the Freedom Rock.

• A Gold Star mother being presented with an American flag at a cemetery to grace the back of the Freedom Rock.

It took Sorensen four and a half days to paint the Freedom Rock, which was completed on July 3. He conveyed the emotion of these touching scenes perfectly, Simonson said. “Bubba is terrific. He’s knowledgeable, patriotic, and professional, plus he’s easy to work with.”

Sorensen appreciated the opportunity to work in Whittemore. “They are such a welcoming community and have such a strong American Legion,” he said. “It was great to visit with these folks after a long day of painting.”

20150727_maxyield_160 (1024x681)Designed to last
Just as freedom isn’t free, neither are Freedom Rocks. Sorensen uses a high-quality, all-natural paint that offers exceptional durability. Blue is the most expensive color at $500 per gallon.

It will cost nearly $20,000 to complete the Kossuth County project, which includes a new fence, a sidewalk to the Freedom Rock, and additional artwork. Mark Lentch, a talented airbrush painter from Whittemore, will paint scenes that didn’t make it on the Freedom Rock onto panels that will be mounted around the stone.

By June 2015, the local American Legion had raised more than $7,000 to help pay for the Freedom Rock. The community is also grateful that an anonymous donor stepped forward and contributed another $5,000 to the project. The Legion is now sponsoring a fundraiser where people can guess the weight of the rock for $10 a chance.

Simonson is thankful so many people have supported the project, which is meaningful to so many veterans. “I get such a feeling of tranquility at the Freedom Rock,” he said. “It’s soothing there.”

Honoring America’s heroes motivates Sorensen, who is now painting his 31st Freedom Rock. “It all starts with conversations about veterans and their stories, which have almost been forgotten sometimes. Each Freedom Rock will help tell these stories for years to come.”

For more information about Iowa’s Freedom Rock project, visit www.TheFreedomRock.com.

Keep Your Nitrogen in the Zone

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Pop quiz—where does most nitrogen loss occur? Below ground. It’s an issue that can easily cost you 15 to 20 bushels of corn per acre.

“If you multiply 20 bushels by $3.50 a bushel, that’s a loss of $70 per acre,” said Joe Bollig, an integrated solutions specialist with MaxYield Cooperative. “That’s also a conservative estimate, since nitrogen losses can lead to yield losses of 40, 50, or even 60 bushels per acre.”

It’s a costly proposition, especially now that nitrogen has become one of the most expensive crop inputs. Nitrogen stabilizers offer a proven solution to combat this challenge. Not all stabilizers are created equal, however. Some are only active on the soil’s surface, for example. “Using the right stabilizer is more important than ever to keep nitrogen in the root zone and maximize your crop input investment,” Bollig said.

Instinct® II and N-Serve® stabilize nitrogen in the root zone, so this vital nutrient is available when your crops need it most. While there are less expensive products on the market, their effectiveness is questionable, Bollig said. Instinct II and N-Serve are the only nitrogen stabilizers accepted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as proven nitrification inhibitors.

“There’s solid science behind these products,” Bollig said. “N-Serve, for example, has been rigorously tested by third-party experts for more than three decades.”

What’s the “magic” behind the method?
While there’s nothing magical about nitrogen stabilizers, it helps to brush up on a little chemistry to understand how they work.

Before anhydrous ammonia is applied, the product is in the NH3 form while it’s still in the tank. After it is applied, however, the product is attracted to moisture in the soil and becomes NH4+. Soil itself has a negative charge. “Opposites attract, which is a good thing,” Bollig said.

Unfortunately, if the soil temperature is 50 degrees or warmer, a bacteria in the soil (Nitrosomonas) begins to convert the NH4+ (ammonium) to NO2- (nitrite) and then the nitrite is quickly oxidized by another bacteria in the soil (Nitrobacter) and converted to the NO3- (nitrate) form of nitrogen.

Because the nitrate form carries a negative charge like the soil, it is not tightly bound. This makes the nitrate mobile in the soil and more readily available for plant uptake, but because of this mobility, it also makes it subject to loss by both leaching and denitrification.

Nitrogen stabilizers circumvent this process by using nitrapyrin to kill the bacteria that start the nitrification process. “Nitrogen stabilizers keep nitrogen in the NH4+ form for 60 to 90 days,” Bollig said. “This protects nitrogen against leaching and makes more nitrogen available to the plants later in the growing season, when the crop really needs it.”

Think of stabilizers as insurance
Nitrogen stabilizers deliver this protection for approximately $10 to $12 per acre. They can generate a return of $40 to $50 per acre, Bollig said.

Nitrogen stabilizers are like full-coverage auto insurance, he added. “You wouldn’t send a valuable new car or truck down the road without proper insurance. Why would you plant a valuable crop and not protect it with nitrogen stabilizer?”

Nitrogen stabilizers can be applied in the fall or spring. N-Serve works well for fall-applied anhydrous ammonia. Instinct II offers versatility, since it can be applied with multiple nitrogen sources, including UAN, urea, and manure.

Now’s a great time to try nitrogen stabilizers, Bollig said. Since Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad approved $9.6 million earlier this summer to support the Iowa Water Quality Initiative, growers who qualify can receive a rebate of $3.50 on every acre where nitrogen stabilizer is applied.

Talk to your MaxYield agronomy specialist or SciMax Solutions specialist for more information about nitrogen stabilizers for your acres. “This best-management practice protects your yield potential and the environment,” Bollig said.