October 23, 2019

Archives for September 2016

Northey: Flood damaged grain considered adulterated and cannot be used for food or feed

For Immediate Release
Thursday, September 30, 2010

Dustin Vande Hoef
Communications Director
515/281-3375 or 515/326-1616 (cell)
or Dustin.VandeHoef@IowaAgriculture.gov

RELATED:::>>> Guidance on Flood Water-Damaged Grain– Iowa State University Extension

Important for farmers to keep grain impacted by flood waters completely separate

DES MOINES – Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey today reminded farmers that grain impacted by flood waters, whether in the field or in a bin, is considered adulterated and cannot be used for feed or food. The grain still in the field should be destroyed and not blended with uncontaminated grain.

“There is the potential for a wide variety of contaminants to enter grain through flood waters, so any corn or soybeans that have been submerged are considered adulterated and must be destroyed,” Northey said.

In the rare situations where the water flooding the field was not contaminated, the grain may be reconditioned. Before being sold, the grain must be reconditioned with the written consent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The floods of 2010 in Iowa contained uncontrolled flood waters that are considered contaminated.

Flood damaged grain is considered adulterated under Chapter 198.7 of the Iowa Code. The Code prohibits the manufacturing or distribution of any food or feed from ingredients that are adulterated.

A short fact sheet further outlining the handling of flood damaged grain can be found on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov.

Kossuth County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Darcie Kramer, County Youth Educator accepts a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership in Kossuth County.

Darcie Kramer, County Youth Educator accepts a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership in Kossuth County.

MaxYield Cooperative recently presented Kossuth County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed $2600 to Kossuth County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Meservey Fire Station Boosted by MaxYield & Matching Funds

dsc_0545-1024x680Jon Kaduce, MaxYield agronomy specialist and Meservey fire chief, recently accepted a $2500 contribution from MaxYield Cooperative for the expansion of the town’s fire station. Kaduce also accepted matching funds from Land O’Lakes Foundation and CoBank’s “Sharing Success” program, which increased the total contribution to $6500.

The new addition to the fire station will make room for larger equipment and vehicles, while also improving and expanding the community center space and other areas of the building.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

About Land O’Lakes Foundation

Land O’Lakes Foundation annually provides matching funds to projects located in communities where member local cooperatives are based. More information can be found at www.landolakesinc.com/responsibility.

About CoBank

CoBank is a national cooperative bank serving vital industries across rural America. The bank provides loans, leases, export financing and other financial services to agribusinesses and rural power, water and communications providers in all 50 states. For more information, visit www.cobank.com.

 

Hunting with Heroes Receives Airfare Contribution

Carol Laubenthal, Algona client care leader, presents Bernie Becker with a contribution to Hunting with Heroes. The contribution pays the airfare to fly soldiers to Iowa for a weekend of hunting in November.

Carol Laubenthal, Algona client care leader, presents Bernie Becker with a contribution to Hunting with Heroes. The contribution pays the airfare to fly soldiers to Iowa for a weekend of hunting in November.

Bernie Becker, co-founder of Hunting with Heroes, recently accepted a contribution totaling $2500 from MaxYield Cooperative.

“Hunting with Heroes” provides a pheasant hunting weekend at the Becker farm near Lakota, IA to injured active-duty U.S. Marines from the Wounded Warrior Battalion at Camp Lejeune, NC.

The contribution from MaxYield Cooperative will pay the airfare to fly the Marines to Iowa for the event, which is held each November during Veteran’s Day weekend. The weekend concludes with a Veterans Appreciation Banquet Sunday, November 13, held at the Lakota Eagle Center.

“MaxYield has been involved with Hunting with Heroes since its inception and we continue to be a proud supporter of this event,” stated Chad Meyer, MaxYield client relations/communications leader. “The benefit Hunting with Heroes provides the soldiers who visit Iowa is amazing and humbling. Also, the recognition and appreciation our local veterans, spouses and widows receive during the banquet makes this event second-to-none.”

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

 

MaxYield Receives 2016 Top Workplaces Award

twp_desmoinesregister_portrait_2016_awWEST BEND, IA, September 19, 2016 – MaxYield Cooperative has been awarded a 2016 Top Workplaces honor by The Des Moines Register. The Top Workplaces lists are based solely on the results of an employee feedback survey administered by WorkplaceDynamics, LLC, a leading research firm that specializes in organizational health and workplace improvement. Several aspects of workplace culture were measured, including Alignment, Execution, and Connection, just to name a few.

“The Top Workplaces award is not a popularity contest. And oftentimes, people assume it’s all about fancy perks and benefits.” says Doug Claffey, CEO of WorkplaceDynamics. “But to be a Top Workplace, organizations must meet our strict standards for organizational health. And who better to ask about work life than the people who live the culture every day—the employees. Time and time again, our research has proven that what’s most important to them is a strong belief in where the organization is headed, how it’s going to get there, and the feeling that everyone is in it together.” Claffey adds, “Without this sense of connection, an organization doesn’t have a shot at being named a Top Workplace.”

MaxYield Cooperative invests in its team members through internships, and trainee programs, said MaxYield CEO Keith Heim. “We also invest heavily in our team and their well-being through education, training, wellness and industry recognized safety programs.”

“We are proud to receive this honor as a top Iowa workplace for the second time,” Heim went on to say. “Once again, a very large percentage of our team members responded to the survey and we are again excited that they overwhelming said MaxYield is a great place to work.”

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Garner Feed Open House

feed-open-houseYou are invited to join us Wednesday, September 14th from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. for MaxYield’s Feed Open House at our Garner office.

What: MaxYield feed mill open house and appreciation meal
When: Wednesday, September 14th Time: 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Where: MaxYield’s Garner office
Who: All current and potential feed clients
Why: To show appreciation and to showcase feed products

Meal will be served: Hamburgers, pork burgers, beans, chips, and cookies!

Please contact any MaxYield office or Eric Malek (515-341-1230) with any questions. See you there!

Riley Kindwall, soil sampling/crop scouting intern

20160613_maxyield_205When Riley Kindwall of Belmond started checking out options for his first college internship, MaxYield made a positive impression on him at the ISU Ag Career Day.

“I talked to Chad Meyer and Kody Trampel from MaxYield, and they were friendly compared to a lot of the other employers,” said Kindwall, 19, who is finishing his final year at Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) before he transfers to ISU to study ag business. “I’m glad I went with a MaxYield internship, because it’s a great experience.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I’ve grown up around agriculture and like everything about it. I enjoy both crops and livestock. I’ve worked with my uncle, Jeff Grossnickel, who has a cattle feedlot and swine confinement operation. I also help Larry Turner grow aronia berries near Belmond.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield soil sampling/crop scouting internship?

A: I’ve learned a lot about soil sampling and how just a couple feet can make a big difference. Sometimes the other MaxYield interns have tag teamed with me on big fields, which makes the work more fun. When it rains, I have the chance to spend more time with my mentor, Steve Schany, and learn about weeds and other agronomy topics.

Q: How have you benefited by having Steve Schany as your mentor at MaxYield?

A: Steve and the MaxYield team are great communicators. They answer your questions and trust you to do the job. While I didn’t see Steve every day, he was always available when I needed him.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I want to stay in agriculture and am interested in a career in sales. I like talking to people and enjoy the one-on-one face time with people.

Editor’s note: Riley is the son of Jeff and Becky Kindwall of Belmond. In his free time, he likes to hunt waterfowl, fish, golf and spend time at the lake.


A Minute with MaxYield Mentor Steve Schany, seed solutions specialist  

Q: What have you enjoyed about working with Riley?
A:
Riley is hard working and resourceful. He’s willing to observe, think things through and learn. Having someone like Riley here is a big help. I enjoy helping him learn the business in the proper way.

Q: What do you appreciate about MaxYield’s internship program?

A: I’m proud that MaxYield’s internship program has been successful in recruiting talent for MaxYield and helping graduates find good jobs in the ag industry.

Trainees to Team Members: New Graduates Grow Their Ag Careers with MaxYield

A business expert on WHO Radio recently said there are two things you don’t tell a millennial, including “you’re too young” and “that’s not how things are done around here.”

After all, this generation is hardwired to embrace technology and find better ways of doing things. That’s why MaxYield Cooperative takes a unique approach with our trainee programs. As our team members work with these young adults, we view ourselves as coaches, not managers. We invest in our trainees. Most importantly, we inspire them to become their best.

Just ask Alex Tussing, MaxYield’s agronomy specialist trainee; Tory Schmidt, who worked for MaxYield part-time before becoming a full-time electrical technician; and Dakota Kraninger, whose on-the-job training led to a full-time outside operations career with MaxYield.

alex tussing (1024x681)Alex Tussing, agronomy specialist trainee
When Alex Tussing graduated from Ankeny High School in 2012, she was one of only a couple students from her class of 530 students who planned to pursue a career in agriculture.

“I was really excited to get back to northwest Iowa with MaxYield,” said Tussing, who graduated from Iowa State University in May 2016 with an ag studies degree and agronomy minor. “Most of my family is from this area, my grandparents farmed near Laurens, and I spent a lot of time with them as I was growing up.”

While Tussing wasn’t sure exactly what career path she wanted to pursue, she appreciates her role as a MaxYield agronomy trainee. The job offers a defined, 12-month learning schedule with plenty of job shadowing. “Instead of just throwing me in the role of an agronomist, the trainee program helps me learn and prepares me to succeed,” Tussing said.

MaxYield agronomy specialists Nolan Hauge in Dickens and Amanda Pederson in Algona help Tussing develop her skills. “Nolan has grown the business quickly in his area,” Tussing said. “Amanda is very knowledgeable and is a good teacher. The two are a really good combination for me, because they show me different ways to be successful.”

Tussing has been busy learning the corn hybrids and soybean varieties sold by MaxYield, as well as the numerous crop protection products offered by the cooperative. As part of this, she documents the crop’s progress at MaxYield’s test plot near Emmetsburg. She also helps answer clients’ agronomy questions, from sprayer issues to hail damage.

“I go with Nolan and Amanda on client calls and am getting to know a lot of the growers,” Tussing said. “I like working with farmers, because I enjoy helping solve their challenges.”

Since there’s always something new in agriculture every day, Tussing appreciates how MaxYield team members help her learn. “The agronomy trainee job is a lot to take in at first, but everyone is willing to help you. I also like MaxYield’s progressive culture, which isn’t stuck in the ‘we’ve always done it that way’ mindset.”

Tussing looks forward to growing her client base in the Dickens area. She’s also excited to correct misinformation and help her non-farm friends learn the facts about agriculture as she learns at MaxYield. “I know I made the right choice to become a MaxYield agronomy trainee,” Tussing said. “It’s an exciting opportunity.”

Editor’s note: In her free time, Tussing likes to go boating, spend time with her family and paint vintage furniture.

tory schmidt (1024x681)Tory Schmidt, electrical technician
Tory Schmidt was well acquainted with MaxYield by the time he took a full-time job as an electrical technician for the cooperative in January 2016. He began working with the MaxYield maintenance team part-time in the summer of 2013 and again during the Christmas 2013 break. He came back in 2014 as he completed his electrician education at Northwest Iowa Community College (NWICC) in Sheldon.

“Working at MaxYield helped me learn a lot about electrical troubleshooting and gave me hands-on, practical experience,” said Schmidt, a 2013 graduate of West Bend-Mallard High School. “I went all over MaxYield, working on anything with wires connected to it.”

Schmidt enjoyed working with Frank Schmidt, MaxYield’s maintenance electrician, and long-time team member Joe Elbert on a variety of jobs. “No two days are ever alike,” said Schmidt, who noted that Frank Schmidt encouraged him to get additional training in electrical technology programming. “I followed Frank’s advice and took some more semesters at NWICC to learn about computer programming, microcontrollers and PLC technology to better understand today’s complex electrical systems,” he said.

Schmidt was eager to start his career at MaxYield after graduating from NWICC at the end of 2015. “I like the variety of work at MaxYield. It’s not just installing light bulbs. It might be working with the IT department, dealing with touch-screen technology or hanging sensors in grain bins.”

Schmidt also likes living in small-town Iowa and appreciates his MaxYield team members. “I really enjoy the maintenance team, because they work well together and are very helpful as they answer my questions.”

They’ve also taught Schmidt how to be a solutions provider. “You solve problems by diving in and eating the elephant one bite at a time,” he noted. “My team has shown me you can have a long-term career here, with many opportunities to grow and learn.”

Editor’s note: In his free time, Schmidt enjoys hunting, fishing and working on vehicles.

dakota kraninger (681x1024)Dakota Kraninger, outside operations
While Dakota Kraninger wanted the chance to farm, working with farmers has been the next best thing. His on-the-job training (OJT) through Iowa Lakes Community College helped him transition successfully to a full-time career at MaxYield.

“I’ve always liked agriculture and grew up working on local farms and participating in FFA and 4-H,” said Kraninger, who completed two OJT sessions with MaxYield before becoming a full-time outside operations team member in August 2015. “It was awesome to transition from OJT to a full-time job at MaxYield.”

In the spring of 2014, the ag business major worked at MaxYield’s Emmetsburg location, where he assisted with fertilizer and seed, in addition to helping at the Spencer seed warehouse. In the spring of 2015, he did most of his OJT at the Spencer seed warehouse. “I’m glad to work with MaxYield, because they have a good name around the area,” said Kraninger, who grew up on an acreage near Milford. “A lot of people do business with them.”

No two days are alike for Kraninger, who travels around MaxYield’s west region to provide clients with the products they need, handle maintenance equipment, run the dry fertilizer facility at Emmetsburg, operate the grain dryer at Mallard and work in the chemical facility at Dickens. “Seed is my favorite part of the business,” said Kraninger, who enjoys working with MaxYield’s agronomists and SciMax Solutions specialists. “I also like learning new things.”

The MaxYield team helps speed up the learning curve. Kraninger credits Walt Reichert, MaxYield’s west area team leader, and Ann Wiese, Emmetsburg location leader, for guiding him. “Walt is very good about finding out your interests and helping you learn more. Ann also makes time for you and answers your questions.”

Kraninger looks forward to growing his career with MaxYield. “There’s always room to move up in the company. There are also a lot of career paths you can pursue here.”

Editor’s note: In his free time, Kraninger enjoys working with vintage farm equipment, including anything John Deere. He purchased his 1964 John Deere 3020 in 5th grade with a $5,000 loan that he paid off early after starting a custom hay-baling business. Kraninger still runs this business and also enjoys hunting, trapping, and spending time with friends and family.

 

Trent Taglauer, agronomy operations intern

20160613_maxyield_257When Trent Taglauer heard about MaxYield during the ISU Ag Career Day, he was intrigued. When he didn’t find quite the right fit for an internship, however, he negotiated.

“I didn’t want to crop scout all day but did want to work with clients and learn how agronomists take information and provide solutions,” said Taglauer, 19, a senior at ISU who is double majoring in ag business and agronomy. “While I had to fit into other companies’ internship molds, MaxYield worked with me.”

Diane Streit, MaxYield’s human resource director, collaborated with MaxYield team members to create an agronomy operations internship. “I’m not just doing operations here, I’m learning operations,” Taglauer said. “This has given me a solid foundation for my career goals.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I grew up in the Fairfield area on a no-till corn and soybean farm near Brighton. My family also has 300 acres of pasture and raises cattle. I like working outside and seeing the life and growth that take place every year on a farm. Watching a tiny seed grow into a 200+ bushel crop is amazing.

FFA also anchored me in ag. I served as my school’s chapter president, as well as a district representative. I became interested in entrepreneurship through FFA. For my supervised agricultural experience (SAE), I ran Tag’s Greenhouse for four years and raised organic plants that I marketed at the local grocery store and farmers’ market.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield agronomy operations internship?

A: I’ve learned a lot about seed and agronomy at MaxYield, including crop protection products. I scout crops with the agronomists a few times a week and convert agronomy sales orders into chemical orders. I’ve driven a tender truck and have learned how to mix fertilizers, too.

While I have certain job responsibilities, there are plenty of opportunities to explore other areas I want to learn. I’m gaining real-world skills that professors in a lecture hall can’t teach you.

It’s also great that MaxYield is a welcoming, family-oriented cooperative. Everyone treats me like a team member, not an intern. If you have the chance to work at a MaxYield internship, do it. The team wants every phase of your internship to go smoothly, from housing arrangements to your job duties.

Q: How have you benefited by having Chuck Bormann as your mentor at MaxYield?

A: Chuck is very flexible. From the get-go he told me the MaxYield team would rely on me heavily. They trust me enough to be at the agronomy plant and work with clients without supervision. I appreciate the trust they place in me.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I want to stay in the Midwest, either Iowa or Illinois. I’m interested in working in the cooperative system at the management level. I love seeing expansion, growth and development and have a passion for management.

Editor’s note: Trent loves traveling in his free time. His adventures have taken him across the United States and to countries ranging from Mexico to Switzerland. For his part-time job, he drives for CIT Signature Transportation, a bus company in Ames, and takes groups to various locations around Iowa.


A Minute with MaxYield Mentor Chuck Bormann, client service representative/Algona agronomy leader

Q: What have you enjoyed about working with Trent?
A:
 Trent is willing to learn, catches on quick and does everything well. I trust him.

Q: What do you appreciate about MaxYield’s internship program?
A:
The internship program helps students find out which career opportunities interest them the most. It also gives MaxYield a good way to see which students might be a good fit for our team after they graduate.

Celeste Swanson, corporate grain accounting/finance intern

20160719_maxyield_327For someone who has always loved math, an internship in finance and grain accounting is the perfect fit. The fact that MaxYield is close to home is another plus for Celeste Swanson of Galt.

“There’s a lot to learn, but MaxYield makes it fun,” said Swanson, 19, an ISU sophomore majoring in ag business. “They treat you like a team member, crack jokes and help take the weight off your shoulders.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I grew up on a farm near Clarion where my family raises row crops and runs a farrow-to-finish swine operation. Farming is a business, and you have to know the numbers.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield grain accounting/finance internship?

A: A lot of this was new to me, and I didn’t realize just how extensive MaxYield’s grain business is. I’ve enjoyed learning how to handle grain settlements, basis contracts, price-later contracts, warehouse receipts, Enogen® corn contracts and trucking schedules. I also enter checks into the accounting system and make sure the money and the bushels match up. The chance to learn more about Harry Bormann’s role with the grain merchandising has helped me gain a bigger picture of the grain industry. I’ve also worked with Susan Post, MaxYield’s chief financial officer, on some corporate accounting.

Q: How have you benefited by having Rick Abrahamson as your mentor at MaxYield?

A: Rick is so approachable and easy to talk to. He’s always willing to help and is making sure I learn everything the right way. On the first day of my internship I felt overwhelmed by all the numbers, but Rick literally sat by my side and walked me through everything. Now I feel I could settle grain contracts in my sleep!

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I definitely want to work with numbers. I plan to add another major in international ag and economics with a minor in statistics before I graduate from ISU. My goal is to take the actuarial exams and possibly go into a career related to ag statistics.

Editor’s note: Celeste is the daughter of Stuart and Lori Swanson. In her free time, Celeste loves to go boating with her family and friends. She also enjoys Rollerblading and showing pigs with her family. The Swansons started showing pigs when Celeste was in 4-H and continue to compete at the Iowa State Fair, as well as open shows in Iowa.


A Minute with MaxYield Mentor Rick Abrahamson, corporate grain accounting  

Q: What have you enjoyed about working with Celeste?
A:
 Celeste is fun and easy to work with. She’s a self-starter, she’s a fast learner and there’s isn’t anything she won’t try. I praise the ag business program at ISU, because these kids have a good sense of what agriculture is all about.

Q: What do you appreciate about MaxYield’s internship program?
A:
It’s fun to mentor students and help them learn real-world job skills. The internship program also keeps us current as times change. The interns often have good ideas that can benefit MaxYield. I wish we could clone these interns and keep them as part of our team!