September 15, 2019

MaxYield Cooperative Contributes Funds towards Dickinson County 4-H Membership Dues

Hannah Brockshus, Dickinson County Extension youth coordinator, recently accepted a contribution from MaxYield Cooperative that will decrease the cost of 4-H for members in the county.

MaxYield Cooperative recently contributed $1330 towards the membership dues for Dickinson County 4-H members. The check was presented to Hannah Brockshus, county youth coordinator, on September 6th. The funds will pay $10 of the $35 state dues for 4-H members in the county. This membership not only allows students to showcase and compete with their projects at the Dickinson County Fair and Iowa State Fair, it also provides them with opportunities to participate in conferences, workshops, and community service.

“We are thrilled to continue our support of local 4-H,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield client relations/communications leader. “We want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Also, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission of supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributes nearly $13,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and it provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture,” Meyer said.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Contributes Funds towards Palo Alto County 4-H Membership Dues

Chad Meyer, client relations/communications leader at MaxYield Cooperative, presents Julie Naig, Palo Alto County Extension youth coordinator a contribution that will decrease the cost of 4-H for members in the county.

MaxYield Cooperative recently made a contribution of $1470 towards the membership dues for all Palo Alto County 4-H members. The check, presented to Julie Naig, county youth coordinator, on September 6th will pay $10 of the $35 state dues for 4-H members in the county. This membership not only allows students to showcase and compete with their projects at the Palo Alto County Fair and Iowa State Fair, it also provides them with opportunities to participate in conferences, workshops, and community service.

“We are thrilled to continue our support of local 4-H,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield client relations/communications leader. “We want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Also, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission of supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributes nearly $13,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and it provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture,” Meyer said.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Announces Positive Fiscal 2019 Results

WEST BEND, IA, – MaxYield Cooperative® recently announced its fiscal results, for the year ending July 31, 2019. The board of directors for MaxYield reviewed and approved the financial audit at their board meeting, held August 22.

MaxYield CEO Keith Heim stated that the cooperative had positive local and total savings to report. “The recently completed fiscal year had reduced corn and soybean bushels in the fall of 2018, compared to recent years and reduced grain drying revenue. That said, the reduced bushels and drying revenue were more than offset by strong margins in most all product areas and disciplined expense control across the cooperative.”

In addition to recent upgrades in Algona and Greenville, MaxYield recently announced the board of director’s approval to build new grain storage in Belmond and Britt in 2020, with each of the bins totaling 725,000 bushels. Heim went on to say that MaxYield’s board of directors continues to place strong emphasis on upgrading and improving facilities, equipment and rolling stock.

MaxYield Cooperative’s Local Savings from Operations for the 2018-2019 fiscal year were $1,790,071 and pre-tax Total Savings for the cooperative totaled $7.4 million.

Heim said that the cooperative’s balance sheet remains very strong. “We continue to build our already solid balance sheet. Term debt was reduced by over $4.8 million, member’s equity increased and we added $2.5 million to working capital in 2019, which is up by over $5.5 million over the past two fiscal years. MaxYield also increased retained savings, which now totals nearly $59 million. In 1997, retained savings at MaxYield were ($122,242), so you can see we continue to make significant progress in strengthening the financial position of MaxYield. Retained savings is a good benchmark putting into perspective the financial improvements here over the past 22 years,” he added.

The cooperative’s annual meeting is December 12, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. at the Kossuth County Ag & Motorsports Museum, located in Algona, IA.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

 

 

 

Temporary Grain Storage Added to Whittemore

MaxYield’s Whittemore grain receiving location constructed additional grain storage capacity in the form of this bunker that was installed recently west of the office.

The bunker, which was formerly installed at MaxYield’s Garner location and was not being used, will hold an estimated 325,000 bushels of corn this fall.

Most recent harvests at Whittemore have seen that location pile grain on the ground to accommodate the grain delivery needs of area members and clients. The Whittemore location has also seen an increase in corn demand usage due to our partnership with a local feed mill.

With the installation of this bunker, MaxYield will be able to hold more bushels this fall during harvest and while also ensure better grain quality when the grain is brought back under roof.

Open House – MaxYield Feed

You are invited to join us on Thursday, August 29th from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. for MaxYield Feed’s open house in Garner!

  • What: MaxYield Feed Open House & Appreciation Meal
  • When: Thursday, August 29th,2019
  • Time: 11:00-1:00
  • Where: MaxYield Office, Garner, IA
  • Who: All current and potential feed clients
  • Why: To Show Appreciation & To Exhibit products on hand

Bacon cheese burgers, beans, chips, pop, and cookies will be served.

For any questions please contact the Garner MaxYield Office @ 641-923-2695 or Eric Malek @ 515-341-1230

MaxYield Board of Directors approve grain storage expansion in Britt, Belmond

MaxYield’s board of directors recently approved the construction of two grain storage bins, one in Britt and one in Belmond. The new bins will each hold 725,000 bushels of grain, similar to the bins shown in this photo.

The MaxYield Cooperative board of directors has approved the construction of additional grain storage at two MaxYield locations. The grain bins, which are set to be completed during the cooperative’s fiscal year 2020, will each be 105’ in diameter and will each hold 725,000 bushels of grain. One of the new grain bins will be constructed at MaxYield’s location in Britt and one will be constructed at the cooperative’s location in Belmond.

Site preparation for the expansion at each location is expected to be completed this fall, with an expected project completion in time for harvest in the fall of 2020. Keith Heim, CEO, is excited about the approved expansion. “I am pleased to announce that the MaxYield Board of Directors approved moving forward with the addition of two grain bin storage projects. Our strong balance sheet, arguably the best in our history, allows us to continue our commitment to upgrading our facilities and equipment at MaxYield Cooperative.”

These projects are in the early stages of development at this time. More details will be shared as they become available by the cooperative.

 

MaxYield Cooperative is a local, diversified farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in Iowa, and southern Minnesota. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Partners with Corteva Agriscience to support Night of 1000 Stars

Ricky Thornton Jr. championed the night in the IMCA Modified feature.

MaxYield Cooperative was proud to partner with Corteva Agriscience for the annual Night of 1000 Stars race at the Hancock County Speedway in Britt, Iowa on August 8th, 2019. The pair sponsored the first 100 IMCA Sport Mod/Modified driver’s pit passes for the night. MaxYield Cooperative appreciates all 129 drivers who made the trek to Britt and put on a show for what looked to be a near sell-out crowd!

Congratulations to Ricky Thornton Jr., who took home the $3500 IMCA Modified win, and all the feature winners from the night! The full press release from IMCA can be read by clicking here.

10 things I wish I would have known before accepting a MaxYield internship

By Emily Campbell

Accepting a new job, an internship, or a big promotion are important events in your life and they bring a lot of feelings with them. When I accepted the Client Relations and Communications internship at MaxYield Cooperative last October, I was incredibly excited but also a little bit anxious. I couldn’t help but thinking “Is this experience really going to be everything I’m expecting?” I knew my experience at MaxYield would be my last internship before graduation, so I really wanted every detail of it to be just the right fit for me.

Now that I’m here, I have nothing to worry about! My experience at MaxYield Cooperative has been a dream from day one. To help put the fears of the next potential class of MaxYield interns to rest, here are 10 things I wish I would have known before accepting a MaxYield internship:

 

  1. You will not be left to ‘fend for yourself’ on the first day. When I accepted this internship, I was worried that I would just show up on the first day and be expected to ‘figure it out.’ Fortunately, that’s not how it was at all. This first week was filled with comprehensive trainings, onboarding sessions, and time with our mentors to dive into goal and expectations for the summer. It is during these first few days that you build a foundation and roadmap for your summer, which will ultimately lead to a more successful internship.

 

  1. Your mentor truly cares about you and will do everything they can to make your experience a great one. I have heard horror stories from college classmates interning at other organizations who have been assigned mentors, only to find that those ‘mentors’ would rather be doing anything else than helping an intern. At MaxYield, each intern is assigned at least one mentor who is passionate about facilitating learning experiences over the summer and making sure their intern has a fulfilling experience! My mentor, Chad Meyer, even reached out to me before the internship started to work together to set goals and make plans. This helped me feel more comfortable and efficient in my first few days of the internship.

 

  1. There is no ‘office drama’. I think we all have this misconception that the larger a workplace is, the more drama it holds. And while that may be true for some organizations, that is not the case at MaxYield Cooperative. I had never worked for a midsize company like MaxYield, so I expected a sudden surge of ‘he said, she said’. I am proud to say that after working for MaxYield Cooperative, I still have no experience with office drama. It sounds a little cliché, but everyone at MaxYield is truly here to help each other and the company succeed. People are happy for each other, and it’s a really welcoming environment.

 

  1. You will be given all the tools you need to succeed, and then some. MaxYield is committed to providing their interns with all the things they need to have a great summer. Whether it be a company vehicle, laptop or iPad, desktop computer, a generous company uniform allowance, housing reimbursement, or anything in-between, MaxYield Cooperative will give you all the tools you need to do your job and do it well. They also tend to upgrade from year to year so interns get to work with some of the latest equipment. When I arrived in May, there was a brand new video camera for me to break in this summer!

 

  1. The people in the area are extremely friendly. I knew the team members at MaxYield would be friendly, as I had already met some of them and heard good things about the team prior to starting my internship. However, what I didn’t know was how MaxYield’s clients would treat interns. As it turns out, the people in the greater MaxYield Cooperative trade area accept interns with open arms! One of my best memories is traveling to a tractor owner’s house to interview him for our annual calendar. While there, we had coffee, I met the family cat, and got to hear about his trip on a veteran’s honor flight. Every person I have interacted with, client or not, has been very friendly and genuinely interested in me and my experience.

 

  1. There are a lot of cool things to do and places to eat here. Before arriving for the summer, I had heard a rumor that Pizza Ranch was like the only restaurant in Northwest Iowa. Birthday dinner? Pizza Ranch. Sunday brunch? Pizza Ranch. Wedding rehearsal? Pizza Ranch- you get the point. Now I don’t want to offend anyone but personally, I’m not a huge fan of ‘The Ranch’, so you can imagine my horror when I thought that every working lunch out would be around a pan of Cactus Bread. To my surprise, there are actually a lot of incredible local places to shop, dine, and do in the MaxYield area! Future interns, I highly recommend The Wagon Wheel and Miller’s to grab a bite, and Feed Mill Coffee Co. or Java 18 for a cup of coffee. In terms of things to do, Crown Salon is my go-to for a pedicure, and both the Kossuth County Speedway and Hancock County Speedway play host to great weekly racing action. Getting to experience the local business offerings of this part of the state has been one of the best things about my summer. Northwest Iowa is a pretty cool place!

 

  1. Even though MaxYield has many locations and over 200 team members, it still feels pretty small. “How will I ever learn anyone’s name? Will they even know who I am?” I have only ever worked for small companies or family businesses, so working for a midsize company like MaxYield was a new ballgame for me. I don’t know what kind of telepathy the full-time team members have, but it literally seemed like everyone knew me before I even introduced myself! This made me feel welcome at MaxYield from the minute I stepped into the office. It’s also been surprisingly easy to remember everyone’s name, face, job title, and even location. This has made corresponding with others in the company especially easy!

 

  1. We get to have fun at work, too! My biggest worry leading up to this summer was that it would be all work and no play. Even though I have a great work ethic and enjoy working, I still wanted to have a little downtime here and there. MaxYield Cooperative makes sure to integrate some fun into your summer, too! This “fun” comes in all shapes and sizes, whether it’s your mentor’s crazy stories on a long road trip, an office birthday party planned by our receptionist Deb, or an intern outing to a waterpark. Having fun and having a great summer learning experience go hand-in-hand at MaxYield, and your summer here will be an enjoyable one, for sure!

 

  1. MaxYield internships are well-rounded. At MaxYield you’re not just focused on getting as much work done as possible. There is emphasis on skill building, networking, professional and personal development, goal setting, industry knowledge, and fun (see #8), too. This is what makes your time at MaxYield more than just a summer job. Whether that’s taking you on an industry tour to the AgCo manufacturing facility or letting you ride along with a freelance photographer, there are a slew of ‘other’ experiences waiting for you at MaxYield!

 

  1. This experience is truly tailored to your needs. While some parts of the internship are standard from year to year, much of it is left up to you. What parts of the industry would you like exposure to? What skills do you want to build? Where do your career goals lie? Your mentor will work will you to find projects and experiences that fit your needs. I mentioned to Chad that I was interested in recruiting. Recruitment isn’t typically the forefront of the communications and client relations internship, but he was willing to work some related experiences in. Now, I have been involved in all parts of the intern recruiting process, and have even taken on a capstone project on recruitment tactics!

 

All-in-all, my MaxYield experience has been more than I expected. And, we have a spot for you in 2020! Contact Chad Meyer, Client Relations/Communications Director at cmeyer@maxyieldcooperative or check out the internship page on our website for more information on our internship program.

MaxYield Algona – No Grain Aug. 7-9

MaxYield’s Algona location will be unable to accept grain Wednesday, August 7 through Friday, August 9 for electrical repairs at the grain elevator. Thank you in advance for your understanding!

Paving His Own Way: Alex Londerville’s Story

If you’d asked Alex Londerville, our newest grain origination trainee, four years ago what he’d be doing after college, the agriculture industry would not have been a topic of conversation. Originally from Swisher, Iowa, Alex spent two years at the University of Iowa’s business college before transferring into ag business at Iowa State University. “I knew I had a love for business and that’s what took me to [the University of] Iowa first. I realized through helping some of my buddies out on their farms that I really had a passion for agriculture, so I decided to combine the two and transferred to Iowa State for an ag business degree.”

Iowa State was also what brought him to MaxYield Cooperative. “I found the [grain origination trainee] position on CyHire (Iowa State’s job board). I was looking for full time openings in grain origination or merchandising, and this was one of the positions I applied for. I really enjoyed meeting everyone [from MaxYield], and [the way I was treated] in the interview was what really sealed the deal.”

A common theme among interns and new hires is their love for MaxYield’s clients and getting the chance to work with them. Alex is no different. “The best part of this position is dealing with clients on a daily basis- whether it’s over the phone or if they stop at the location, or if I go out in the country by myself for the day, it’s nice to just talk to them and get to know them. That’s what I like most about it.”


Mick Hoover, risk management team leader, serves as Alex’s mentor. Mick’s mentorship is something Alex considers an asset when beginning his career at MaxYield. “I’ve benefitted from having Mick as a mentor just by seeing his love and his passion for grain origination. By talking to him I know how much he loves those things, even if he doesn’t do it on a daily basis anymore. Just seeing his drive gives me drive, too, and a desire to be successful at it.”

‘Fantastic’ rolled off the tongue as a way to encompass his experience at MaxYield so far. “I really like what I do. I’ve only been doing it for a couple of months now but I really enjoy the company and my job, and I’m excited about the future… Once I [build my] skills in grain origination and grow my relationship with clients, I look forward to growing within MaxYield; taking on more responsibilities, becoming more of an asset to the company and to our clients, and to being successful.”

The team members at MaxYield want to see Alex become successful, too, by sharing their knowledge and support, which is one reason he would recommend working at the cooperative to anyone with an interest. “Without a doubt go for it… The wealth of knowledge and the guidance that you get working here is second to none. Just go in with open arms, open eyes, and open ears and embrace it.”