October 23, 2018

Lakota Hunting with Heroes Receives Airfare Donation

Bernie Becker accepts MaxYield’s contribution to the Lakota Hunting with Heroes organization. MaxYield annually pays the airfare for marines from Camp Lejeune’s Wounded Warrior Battalion to attend a weekend of hunting and healing in North Iowa.

Bernie Becker, co-founder of Lakota Hunting with Heroes, recently accepted a contribution totaling $2500 from MaxYield Cooperative.

Hunting with Heroes provides a pheasant-hunting weekend at the Becker farm near Lakota, IA to injured active-duty U.S. Marines from the Wounded Warrior Battalion at Camp Lejeune, NC.

The contribution from MaxYield Cooperative will pay the airfare to fly the Marines to Iowa for the event, which is held each November during Veteran’s Day weekend. The weekend concludes with a Veterans Appreciation Banquet Sunday, November 11, held at the Lakota Eagle Center.

“MaxYield has been involved with Hunting with Heroes since its inception and we continue to be a proud supporter of this event,” stated Chad Meyer, MaxYield client relations/communications leader. “The benefit Hunting with Heroes provides the soldiers who visit Iowa is amazing and humbling. Also, the recognition and appreciation our local veterans, spouses and widows receive during the banquet continues to grow every year.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Receives 2018 Top Workplaces Award

WEST BEND, IA, September 17, 2018 – MaxYield Cooperative has been awarded a 2018 Top Workplaces honor by The Des Moines Register. The award is based solely on feedback gathered through a third-party survey administered by research partner Energage, LLC. The anonymous survey measures several aspects of workplace culture, including alignment, execution, connection, and more.

“Top Workplaces is more than just recognition,” said Doug Claffey, CEO of Energage. “Our research shows organizations that earn the award attract better talent, experience lower turnover, and are better equipped to deliver bottom-line results. Their leaders prioritize and carefully craft a healthy workplace culture that supports employee engagement.”

“We’re excited to be honored again as a Top Workplace employer,” said Keith Heim, MaxYield’s CEO. “Recognition like this reaffirms MaxYield’s commitment to providing our team members with the opportunity to succeed and create a company that performs at its best, too.”

“Becoming a Top Workplace isn’t something organizations can buy,” Claffey said. “It’s an achievement organizations have worked for and a distinction that gives them a competitive advantage. It’s a big deal.”

MaxYield has received the Top Workplace award each of the last three years and four times overall.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

 

Palo Alto County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Julie Naig, Palo Alto County Extension youth coordinator, accepts a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership.

MaxYield Cooperative recently presented Palo Alto County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed over $1400 to Palo Alto County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Announces Fiscal 2018 Results

WEST BEND, IA, – MaxYield Cooperative® recently announced its fiscal results, for the year ending July 31, 2018. The board of directors for MaxYield reviewed and approved the financial audit at their board meeting, held August 23.

“The recently completed year-end showed solid earnings and financial results in a continued challenging agricultural environment,” stated MaxYield CEO Keith Heim. “We had a strong fall 2017 season and even with a very difficult spring, in which some crop inputs and nutrients were simply not applied, seed, crop nutrient and crop protection margins in total were higher than the previous fiscal year.”

Heim added that other noteworthy accomplishments included strong grain drying revenues, increased propane gallons, solid energy margins, plus increased transportation, SciMax Solutions and feed revenues. “Our emphasis on expense control, plus improved grain margins in 2018 also helped us achieve strong fiscal results,” he added.

MaxYield Cooperative’s Local Savings from Operations for the 2017-2018 fiscal year were $1,593,687, and pre-tax Total Savings for the cooperative totaled nearly $4.9 million.

Heim noted that the cooperative continues to build its balance sheet. “This is arguably the strongest balance sheet in our cooperative’s history. Term debt was reduced by $4.4 million, member’s equity increased and we added $3.0 million to working capital in 2018. MaxYield also increased retained savings, which now totals nearly $52 million. In 1997, retained savings were ($122,242), so you can see we continue to make significant progress in strengthening the financial position of MaxYield. We have been and will continue to focus on enhancing revenue and decreasing expenses in this tight economic environment,” he added.

The cooperative’s annual meeting is December 10, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at the Britt Community Center, located in Britt, IA.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Nancy Beck Retires from Fostoria Cenex Store

MaxYield Cooperative energy team leader, Chad Besch (right), presents Fostoria Cenex store manager, Nancy Beck, with a gift of appreciation for her service to MaxYield. Beck began her career at the Fostoria Cenex store in 1995. Her last day was August 17.

MaxYield wished Nancy all the best in her retirement!

MaxYield Cooperative is a local farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in Iowa, and southern Minnesota. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCooperative.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Dickinson County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Hannah Brockshus, Dickinson County Extension youth coordinator, accepts a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership.

MaxYield Cooperative recently presented Dickinson County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed nearly $1600 to Dickinson County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Statement regarding traffic accident near Humboldt, IA August 21

On Tuesday, August 21, 2018 in the late afternoon, a MaxYield Cooperative semi-truck and trailer driven by a MaxYield team member was involved in a traffic accident with another vehicle north of Humboldt, IA at the Hwy 169 and Bode intersection. One person has been confirmed deceased in the accident, and another occupant of the vehicle was transported by helicopter from the scene of the accident to a medical facility.

The driver of MaxYield’s semi-truck was evaluated and released from a local hospital late Tuesday evening.

MaxYield has and will continue to cooperate fully with the post-accident investigation with the Iowa Department of Transportation.

MaxYield Feed Open House – Aug 22

You are invited to join us Wednesday, August 22 from 11 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. for MaxYield’s feed open house at our Garner office.

What: MaxYield Feed open house & appreciation meal

When: Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Time: 11-1

Where: MaxYield location, Garner

Who: All current and future feed clients

Hamburgers, pork burgers, beans, chips, cookies and beverage served!

For more information, contact our Garner office at 641-923-2695 or Eric Malek at 515-341-1230. See you there!

Dayton Brugman, crop scouting/soil sampling intern

In some ways, interning at MaxYield was like coming home for Dayton Brugman. Not only was he back in northwest Iowa close to his hometown, but his internship has allowed him to learn even more about local agriculture.

“I’ve grown up around MaxYield and heard about how good their internships are,” said Brugman, 19, a 2017 Clay Central Everly High School graduate who is studying ag business at Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) in Ankeny. “I worked in Dickens at the chemical facility and at the seed warehouse in Spencer this spring. Treating seed and learning about the different types of seed really sparked my interest in agronomy.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I grew up on a corn and soybean farm near Peterson, so ag has been part of my life from the beginning. I like it and try to stay connected to farming no matter where I’m at. In the fall, I work for a farmer near Ankeny and run the combine for him.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield internship?

A: I got an early start on my internship since I started here in March 2018. With a MaxYield internship you learn the foundations of agronomy from the roots up. I’ve learned a lot by participating in MaxYield’s plot days, where you learn from MaxYield’s team and speakers from WinField.

I was based out of Everly but had the chance to go all over MaxYield’s trade territory. I got into soil sampling, crop scouting and tissue sampling. While there’s a push on getting the work done, MaxYield always emphasizes learning. It’s not just busy work. The team is also fun to work with.

I’d definitely recommend a MaxYield internship. It’s so much different than writing answers on a test at college. It’s a lot easier to grasp these concepts in the field.

Q: How have you benefited by having Mason Mentink as your mentor at MaxYield?

A: Mason is very knowledgeable about agronomy. He’s always fun to talk to and is good with the clients. His ability to communicate with them is impressive because he knows how to adapt to different personalities. He knows what each client expects of MaxYield and works hard to serve them.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  After I graduate from DMACC, I plan to transfer to ISU in the fall of 2019. I’m undecided about what I want to do at ISU and in my career, but my MaxYield internship is helping me find out what interests me. I know I want to stay in Iowa after college. I’d like to come back to northwest Iowa, because I’m interested in production ag and running our family’s farm.

Editor’s note: Brugman appreciated the chance to have an internship close to home, since he raises show pigs. These pigs have won top honors at the Clay County Fair and have competed in shows including the Iowa State Fair, the World Pork Expo and the Arizona National in Phoenix. Raising pigs is a family affair for Brugman, his parents (Dan and Darcy), his younger brother, Davin, and his younger sister, Dalayna. In his free time, Brugman also enjoys watching sports, including the Minnesota Vikings, ISU men’s basketball and the Washington Capitals ice hockey team. He’s also a fan of the Stanley Cup finals.

Cody Tjossem, crop scouting/soil sampling intern

Cody Tjossem doesn’t settle for average. Instead of just one major, he decided to pursue two majors at ISU.

“I looked into accounting but decided that was kind of boring,” said Tjossem, 19, a sophomore who is majoring in ag business and supply chain management. “I was more interested in business and chose supply chain management because I like how it’s focused on doing things as efficiently as possible.”

When it was time to look for a summer internship, this ambitious, 2017 South O’Brien High School graduate was already familiar with MaxYield. “My brother, Brian, used to be an applicator for MaxYield, and he always had great things to say about the company,” said Tjossem, who visited with the MaxYield team at the ISU College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Career Day.

The more he learned about MaxYield, the more he liked the internship program and MaxYield’s core values. “Going into this, I wanted to be able to say I worked hard and got lots of experience here,” Tjossem said. “It’s important to get involved as much as you can, especially leadership positions, and get a lot of life experience.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: My parents, Vernon and De Ann Tjossem, farm near Sutherland and Royal and raise corn and soybeans. I like growing things and enjoy making new things. That’s what a lot of farming is. You put a seed in the ground and see if you can grow it into a good yield.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield internship?

A: While it’s hard to stay busy at some agronomy internships, there’s lots of hands-on training in the field at MaxYield. To actually be able to see and touch the things you’re learning about is great, because it’s nothing like just reading a textbook.

We do tissue sampling early in the week, soil sampling and crop scouting. I also want to learn more about machinery and equipment, and you need a strong base in agronomy to make the most of technology. MaxYield’s team members are always willing to help me learn.

I know the work we’re doing matters because MaxYield’s clients want us to help them learn how to grow better crops.

Q: How have you benefited by having Brian Cable and Megan Phelan as your mentors at MaxYield?

A: Brian is very personable and has introduced me to clients and the various MaxYield team members in the area. This made me feel welcome at MaxYield. I’ve also appreciated all the hands-on experience Megan has given me with tissue sampling and other projects. She’s a good teacher.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I’d prefer to stay in Iowa, but I’ll go where the jobs are.

 Editor’s note: Tjossem likes to be outside, spending time with family and friends, golfing and boating at the lake. He’s involved in ISU’s Ag Business Club, which invites guest speakers to campus to share their stories of business ownership and offer tips on how to succeed in business.