November 25, 2020

Bring on the Grain: Mallard Location Prepares to Modernize

Jeff Marsh (left) and Walt Reichert go over plans to expand the grain facilities in Mallard.

Jeff Marsh (left) and Walt Reichert go over plans to expand the grain facilities in Mallard.

When you’re harvesting, you don’t want to be stuck in line at the elevator waiting to unload your grain. That’s why MaxYield Cooperative is investing in a multi-phase project to enhance the Mallard location’s grain handling systems and add more storage capacity.

“The speed at which we can receive grain at harvest is important to our clients,” said Walt Reichert, MaxYield’s West Area team leader. “Plus, our grain origination team has been successful at bringing in new business, and we want to provide the best service we can.”

MaxYield’s board of directors recently approved plans for a grain system upgrade at Mallard, which is one of MaxYield’s three largest grain receiving facilities and includes 110-car shuttle capabilities. Phase I, which will begin in the spring of 2014, will include the addition of a separate grain receiving area with a pit; a 20,000-bushel-per-hour receiving leg and conveyance system; and one 725,000-bushel bin.

A second 725,000-bushel bin will be added in Phase II, which may be considered in 2015. The Mallard expansion project will eventually become a four-bin site, Reichert said.

Progressive solutions focus on the future

Construction has begun on Phase I of the Mallard project.

Construction has begun on Phase I of the Mallard project.

This spring and summer, MaxYield will eventually phase out the antiquated soybean house in Mallard, remove other small, obsolete facilities at the location, and bring a high percentage of the temporary storage under roof. The temporary storage bunker was built to hold 1 million bushels, Reichert noted, but the Mallard location has consistently exceeded this, often with totals up to 1.4 million bushels.

“We will continue to use the temporary storage area for growth bushels,” said Keith Heim, CEO. “When there are enough bushels to consistently fill the temporary storage area, we’ll consider moving into phase III of this multi-phase expansion.”

All this will help keep the Mallard location competitive in MaxYield’s West Region, Reichert said. “We want to remain progressive and identify what we need to do to serve our existing clients effectively and attract new clients.”

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