November 20, 2018

Looking for Financing Options?

In these times of tight margins, it pays to assess all your options, especially when it comes to financing inputs for the 2019 crop.

MaxYield’s options include:

  • In-house financing. MaxYield offers delayed-price diesel, summer-fill liquid propane (LP) and terms on fall and spring inputs. Fall inputs can be picked up and applied before payment is due January 20. Spring inputs can be paid for by July 20. “If you pay early, you can also earn discounts,” Post noted. Pre-paid dollars lock in the best prices. “However, our in-house financing offers you a longer time period to pay for some of your big-ticket items,” Post said.
  • John Deere Financial. You can also access financing options through John Deere Financial, which has been a trusted partner at MaxYield for years. “Our relationships with national companies allow us to pass along low rates,” said Chad Hefel, Iowa sales manager for John Deere Financial. “Along with saving money, you can access an unsecured line of credit to help preserve your cash flow on your operating line of credit.”

You can apply for credit or request a credit increase for a John Deere Financial account through the MaxYield Seed website (www.maxyieldseed.com). Getting your application in sooner rather than later is smart, Post noted. “This provides the most flexibility in obtaining the crop inputs you need now and then pay after harvest.”

  • Rabo AgriFinance. MaxYield also has arrangements with Rabo AgriFinance, a global leader in agriculture financing. “This can be the right option for some people,” said Post, who encourages you to visit with your local MaxYield agronomist or seed team specialist to explore your options.

How does 0% financing sound?

Maybe you’re thinking, “I have enough money to make my purchases without a loan. Why should I look into financing?”

There are still some 0% financing deals out there, Post said. “These deals allow opportunities to utilize cash elsewhere. In any case, we encourage you to assess which solutions fit your business, and we look forward to working with you.”

“We provide you choices,” said Susan Post, chief financial officer for MaxYield Cooperative. “We encourage you to do the math, talk to financial professionals like your banker and tax advisor to assess cash flow needs, and determine the solution that fits your operation.”

Maintaining Trust Through Changing Times

Financing options don’t just affect your business. They also impact your cooperative.

“Times have changed,” said Susan Post, chief financial officer at MaxYield Cooperative. “Vendors are asking us for prepaid money sooner and are paying rebates back later in order to stretch the time value of money to their benefit.”

Never Too Late to Say Thank You: Honor Flight Helps Vietnam Veteran Heal

The shrieks from one angry man at the San Francisco airport in October 1969 still haunt Ken Kerber. They echo long after Kerber returned to America from his service as an Air Force crew chief in Thailand during the Vietnam War.

“I wasn’t 50 feet off the ramp when that protestor starting shouting,” said Kerber, a retired MaxYield Cooperative truck driver.

The protestor’s venom infuriated Kerber, who had not only enlisted and served honorably in the U.S. Air Force from 1965 and 1969, but had married and started a family during this time. Kerber had been proud to serve his country, yet he couldn’t erase memories of his military service fast enough.

“When I came home, I burned everything but my combat boots and my medals as soon as I could,” said Kerber, who grew up in the Fenton area. “I started farming and didn’t talk about my military service for 20 years.”

He could have shared stories about receiving the Vietnam service medal, good conduct medal and target shooting medal, but why bother? The whole topic of Vietnam seemed to trigger nothing but rage.

“A lot of my friends were in the local American Legion, but I didn’t want anything to do with it then,” said Kerber, who had experience with T-38 pilot trainers in Arizona and became a crew chief specializing in F-4 fighter jets in Vietnam.

Time has a way of changing things, though. When Kerber had the chance to join the Brushy Creek Area Honor Flight from Fort Dodge to Washington, D.C. this spring, he took the opportunity.

“It was awesome,” said Kerber, who is amazed that he and his fellow veterans were greeted by more than 400 people and a band when they arrived at Washington Dulles International Airport on May 12. “Little kids – maybe 4 or 5 years old, shook our hands and thanked us for our service. I cried like a baby, because I’d never received a thank you like this.”

Experiencing memorials to mail call

North Iowa veterans from the Vietnam War, the Korean War and World War II spent the entire day in Washington, D.C., visiting war memorials and sharing memories that only fellow veterans truly understand.

“We got a police escort all day, so our bus didn’t stop at any traffic lights,” said Kerber, who is grateful for donors like MaxYield that make the Honor Flights possible. “They told us, ‘You are as important today as the president of the United States.’”

This was Kerber’s first time in Washington, D.C., and he appreciated seeing the Vietnam Veterans memorial, the World War II

memorial and the Korean War memorial. What impressed him most, though, was the Air Force memorial and its missing-man formation.

When it was time to return to Iowa, Kerber and his fellow veterans were surprised by mail call on the plane. “When you were in the service, two days were very important to us—pay day and mail call,” Kerber said. “It was great to receive letters written by our family, and each one of us got a PayDay candy bar, too.”

Embracing freedom, family and patriotism

            Family is important to Kerber. He started his own family in his early 20s while he was in the Air Force. His daughter, Angela, was born October 14, 1967, less than a week before he shipped out on October 20 for overseas duty.

“I missed out on her early years,” said Kerber, who knew Angela didn’t recognize him when he returned home. “She started crying when I gave her mom a hug and a kiss.”

Kerber doesn’t regret his military service, though. He had been employed by a lumberyard in Fenton where he worked in construction before enlisting in the Air Force at age 20. “I loved being a crew chief,” Kerber said. “I liked being outside and enjoyed working on aircraft.”

While Kerber was stationed in Thailand, far removed from the worst battles in Vietnam, conditions weren’t always easy. “It was so hot, plus there was monsoon season, so our barracks were about 2 to 3 feet off the ground.”

All those memories were part of the past, though, for Kerber, who farmed for 30 years near Fenton until 2000. He also hauled livestock, mainly feeder pigs, for four years and became an over-the-road trucker for one year. In 2004, he started a new job as a trucker for MaxYield.

“I hauled everything but fuel,” Kerber said. “I mostly hauled grain and fertilizer, and I saw the whole company with my route.”

That freedom appealed to Kerber. “I loved trucking for MaxYield. It would have driven me nuts to sit in one spot all day.”

Since he retired in 2010, Kerber stays active in the local community. He sings bass with the Cornbelt Chorus barbershop group, which is based in Algona. The group performs concerts in Algona and Emmetsburg each March. They also offer church sing outs once or twice a year. The group selects a town, contacts a local church and schedules a Sunday performance.

Barbershop is fun,” Kerber said. “We want to get back into competitions, too.”

Kerber also enjoys spending time with his family, including his wife, Ruth, their children and 17 grandchildren. Many of his family and friends came to Fort Dodge when the May 12 Honor Flight landed at the airport around 11 p.m.

“My wife says I’m a soft-hearted veteran. The Honor Flight, Memorial Day and the 4th of July get me right here,” said Kerber, tapping his chest over his heart. “When someone asked if I’d do the Honor Flight again if I could, and I said, ‘Yes, in a heartbeat.’”

 

 

MaxYield’s Annual Meeting – to be held December 10, 2018

The stockholders of MaxYield Cooperative are cordially invited to attend the company’s annual meeting, which will take place:

Date:     December 10, 2018

Place:    Britt Community Center
170 Main Ave. South
Britt, IA
(located next to Britt City Hall)

Time:     9:30 a.m.             Refreshments
10:00 a.m.           Annual Meeting
10:45 a.m.           Adjourn

Letters will be mailed mid-November to all Class A (voting) members of MaxYield. Letters will include the formal annual meeting invitation, director election ballot and director candidate profiles.

The following directors are seeking election to the MaxYield Cooperative board.

Barry Anderson, Greenville, IA, running unopposed in MaxYield’s West Area (west of IA Hwy 4)

Ron Rouse, Curlew, IA, running unopposed in MaxYield’s West Area (west of IA Hwy 4)

Howard Haas, Algona, IA running unopposed in MaxYield’s Central Area (between IA Hwy 4 and Hwy 17)

We ask that ballots be returned in the postage paid envelopes, postmarked no later than December 3, 2018.

We look forward to sharing MaxYield’s successful fiscal year with our membership at our annual meeting. We hope to see you there!

 

Lakota Hunting with Heroes Receives Airfare Donation

Bernie Becker accepts MaxYield’s contribution to the Lakota Hunting with Heroes organization. MaxYield annually pays the airfare for marines from Camp Lejeune’s Wounded Warrior Battalion to attend a weekend of hunting and healing in North Iowa.

Bernie Becker, co-founder of Lakota Hunting with Heroes, recently accepted a contribution totaling $2500 from MaxYield Cooperative.

Hunting with Heroes provides a pheasant-hunting weekend at the Becker farm near Lakota, IA to injured active-duty U.S. Marines from the Wounded Warrior Battalion at Camp Lejeune, NC.

The contribution from MaxYield Cooperative will pay the airfare to fly the Marines to Iowa for the event, which is held each November during Veteran’s Day weekend. The weekend concludes with a Veterans Appreciation Banquet Sunday, November 11, held at the Lakota Eagle Center.

“MaxYield has been involved with Hunting with Heroes since its inception and we continue to be a proud supporter of this event,” stated Chad Meyer, MaxYield client relations/communications leader. “The benefit Hunting with Heroes provides the soldiers who visit Iowa is amazing and humbling. Also, the recognition and appreciation our local veterans, spouses and widows receive during the banquet continues to grow every year.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Receives 2018 Top Workplaces Award

WEST BEND, IA, September 17, 2018 – MaxYield Cooperative has been awarded a 2018 Top Workplaces honor by The Des Moines Register. The award is based solely on feedback gathered through a third-party survey administered by research partner Energage, LLC. The anonymous survey measures several aspects of workplace culture, including alignment, execution, connection, and more.

“Top Workplaces is more than just recognition,” said Doug Claffey, CEO of Energage. “Our research shows organizations that earn the award attract better talent, experience lower turnover, and are better equipped to deliver bottom-line results. Their leaders prioritize and carefully craft a healthy workplace culture that supports employee engagement.”

“We’re excited to be honored again as a Top Workplace employer,” said Keith Heim, MaxYield’s CEO. “Recognition like this reaffirms MaxYield’s commitment to providing our team members with the opportunity to succeed and create a company that performs at its best, too.”

“Becoming a Top Workplace isn’t something organizations can buy,” Claffey said. “It’s an achievement organizations have worked for and a distinction that gives them a competitive advantage. It’s a big deal.”

MaxYield has received the Top Workplace award each of the last three years and four times overall.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

 

Palo Alto County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Julie Naig, Palo Alto County Extension youth coordinator, accepts a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership.

MaxYield Cooperative recently presented Palo Alto County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed over $1400 to Palo Alto County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Announces Fiscal 2018 Results

WEST BEND, IA, – MaxYield Cooperative® recently announced its fiscal results, for the year ending July 31, 2018. The board of directors for MaxYield reviewed and approved the financial audit at their board meeting, held August 23.

“The recently completed year-end showed solid earnings and financial results in a continued challenging agricultural environment,” stated MaxYield CEO Keith Heim. “We had a strong fall 2017 season and even with a very difficult spring, in which some crop inputs and nutrients were simply not applied, seed, crop nutrient and crop protection margins in total were higher than the previous fiscal year.”

Heim added that other noteworthy accomplishments included strong grain drying revenues, increased propane gallons, solid energy margins, plus increased transportation, SciMax Solutions and feed revenues. “Our emphasis on expense control, plus improved grain margins in 2018 also helped us achieve strong fiscal results,” he added.

MaxYield Cooperative’s Local Savings from Operations for the 2017-2018 fiscal year were $1,593,687, and pre-tax Total Savings for the cooperative totaled nearly $4.9 million.

Heim noted that the cooperative continues to build its balance sheet. “This is arguably the strongest balance sheet in our cooperative’s history. Term debt was reduced by $4.4 million, member’s equity increased and we added $3.0 million to working capital in 2018. MaxYield also increased retained savings, which now totals nearly $52 million. In 1997, retained savings were ($122,242), so you can see we continue to make significant progress in strengthening the financial position of MaxYield. We have been and will continue to focus on enhancing revenue and decreasing expenses in this tight economic environment,” he added.

The cooperative’s annual meeting is December 10, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at the Britt Community Center, located in Britt, IA.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Nancy Beck Retires from Fostoria Cenex Store

MaxYield Cooperative energy team leader, Chad Besch (right), presents Fostoria Cenex store manager, Nancy Beck, with a gift of appreciation for her service to MaxYield. Beck began her career at the Fostoria Cenex store in 1995. Her last day was August 17.

MaxYield wished Nancy all the best in her retirement!

MaxYield Cooperative is a local farmer-owned cooperative serving members and clients in Iowa, and southern Minnesota. Founded in 1915, MaxYield Cooperative is headquartered in West Bend, Iowa. More information about the cooperative can be found online at www.MaxYieldCooperative.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Dickinson County 4-H Membership Dues Decreased

Hannah Brockshus, Dickinson County Extension youth coordinator, accepts a contribution from MaxYield that will decrease the cost of 4-H membership.

MaxYield Cooperative recently presented Dickinson County Extension and Outreach with a contribution aimed at decreasing the cost of enrollment in 4-H youth programs.

“We are continuing our support of local 4-H and commitment to our youth,” said Chad Meyer, MaxYield Client Relations Director. “Recently, we presented a contribution for $10.00 per 4-H member in order to decrease the cost of 4-H membership.”

Meyer said the cooperative has two goals in providing the program. “First, we want to make 4-H an affordable youth program for local families, especially families that have multiple children enrolled. Secondly, by paying a portion of each 4-H member’s enrollment fee, we are able to continue our mission in supporting 4-H so that each member benefits.”

The cooperative contributed nearly $1600 to Dickinson County Extension and Outreach and will contribute more than $18,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

“We believe that 4-H is one of the cornerstones in developing youth and 4-H provides an excellent foundation to build strong families. 4-H also provides a great way for young people to learn more about agriculture and its exciting future,” commented Meyer.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Statement regarding traffic accident near Humboldt, IA August 21

On Tuesday, August 21, 2018 in the late afternoon, a MaxYield Cooperative semi-truck and trailer driven by a MaxYield team member was involved in a traffic accident with another vehicle north of Humboldt, IA at the Hwy 169 and Bode intersection. One person has been confirmed deceased in the accident, and another occupant of the vehicle was transported by helicopter from the scene of the accident to a medical facility.

The driver of MaxYield’s semi-truck was evaluated and released from a local hospital late Tuesday evening.

MaxYield has and will continue to cooperate fully with the post-accident investigation with the Iowa Department of Transportation.