January 26, 2021

MaxYield Contributes to Kossuth Saddle Club Fundraiser

James Rotert (center), president of the Kossuth Saddle Club and his daughter Kara, accept a contribution of $1000 from MaxYield Cooperative, presented by Chuck Bormann, MaxYield’s Agronomy Leader in Algona.

WEST BEND, IOWA, January 6 – MaxYield Cooperative recently made a contribution of $1000 to the Kossuth Saddle Club. The check, presented to club president James Rotert and his daughter Kara on January 6th, will assist the club in purchasing a used tractor and new arena rake. The new equipment will be used to maintain and improve the riding surface at the club’s arena, increasing safety for riders and their animals.

“We are thrilled with the support we received from the county so far and from this donation by MaxYield,” said Rotert. “With more events being held at the saddle club arena and the increased number of riders, upgrading our ground preparation equipment is important. Better footing for horses will improve the animal and rider’s safety and with this contribution we’re another step closer to making it happen.”

“MaxYield is happy to help the Kossuth Saddle Club with this donation that will provide needed upgrades for maintaining the arena on the fairgrounds. Several of our members and clients participate in the activities the club puts on and the arena is used by several 4-H’ers in our area, too,” said Chad Meyer, Client Relations/Communications Leader at MaxYield.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com

 

Clay County 4-H Membership Dues Reduced by Contribution from MaxYield Cooperative

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Clay County staff members accept a donation from MaxYield Cooperative totaling $1520. From Left to Right: Isabel Dehrkoop, County Youth Program Coordinator; Sarah Dirks, In-School & Adult Human Sciences Program Coordinator; and Jo Engel, Youth Human Sciences Program Coordinator. The funds will cover $10 of every Clay County 4-H member’s annual dues.

SPENCER, IA – MaxYield Cooperative recently contributed $1520 towards the membership dues for Clay County 4-H members. The check was presented to Isabel Dehrkoop, Clay County Youth Program Coordinator, and other ISU Extension and Outreach staff on December 16th. The funds will pay $10 of the $35 state dues for 4-H members in the county. This membership not only allows students to display and compete with their projects at the Clay County Fair and Iowa State Fair, it also provides them with opportunities to participate in conferences, workshops, and community service.

“MaxYield Cooperative recognizes the value that 4-H brings, not only to the youth that participate but also to our communities,” explained Emily Campbell, talent recruitment and communications specialist at MaxYield Cooperative. “Being a 4-H alumna myself, I know that the members of Clay County 4-H will be the next generation of leaders that impacts the world. MaxYield is proud to assist the next generation of leaders in growing as 4-Hers by easing the financial obligation of the families of Clay County’s 150-plus members.”

The cooperative contributes nearly $13,000 to 4-H in seven Iowa counties annually.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com

ALL Deferred Grain Checks to be mailed January 4th

Due to precautions surrounding COVID-19, ALL Deferred Grain Checks will be mailed

 

Dear Valued MaxYield Grain Clients:

For many years we’ve delivered your deferred grain checks to your nearest MaxYield location for pickup right after the New Year holiday. All checks that were not picked up were then placed in the mail.

Due to precautions surrounding COVID-19, ALL MaxYield Deferred Grain Checks will be printed and mailed on January 4, 2021.

We appreciate your understanding as we do all we can to keep you and our team safe this winter. And most of all, we appreciate your business!!

MaxYield Cooperative Announces Keith Heim to Retire as CEO

WEST BEND, IA – MaxYield Cooperative’s board of directors announced today that Keith Heim, who has led the cooperative as CEO since 2007, plans to retire on July 1, 2021. The board also announced they have retained the services of Hedlin Ag Services located in Ankeny, IA to lead the search for MaxYield’s next CEO. The targeted date for MaxYield’s new CEO to begin at the West Bend, IA-based member-owned agricultural cooperative is July 1, 2021.

Under Heim’s leadership, the cooperative has enjoyed financial strength and stability in addition to significant upgrades in rolling stock and facilities. Heim also led MaxYield through the acquisition of seven northwest Iowa country elevator and ag retail locations from The Andersons, Inc. in 2016.

Prior to joining MaxYield, Heim was the General Manager/Executive Vice President of Farm Service Cooperative, based in Harlan, Iowa, a position he began in 1988.

“We are grateful for all that Keith has done for MaxYield,” said Howard Haas, Algona area farmer and MaxYield’s board chairman. “During his 13 years here, MaxYield’s sales have nearly doubled and the financial strength of the cooperative has never been better. Our balance sheet is very strong and retained savings, which were ($122,242) in 1997, now total nearly $67 million.”

Haas went on to say that’s Heim’s contribution to MaxYield goes beyond just strong financials. “The board has certainly enjoyed working with Keith and we wish him and his wife Deb all the best in retirement. We have appreciated his focus on providing solutions for our members and clients, while significantly upgrading the assets at MaxYield. His commitment to our team members and their safety is something that we are also very grateful for.”

Haas also stated that he expects a seamless transition to the next CEO as Heim has agreed to remain available to MaxYield for a transition period beyond July 1, 2021.

“Earlier this year I expressed interest in retirement to the board of directors and I appreciate their support and the CEO succession plan they developed,” said Heim. “I look forward to continuing as CEO and working with our clients, members and MaxYield team members into next summer. It has been my pleasure to lead MaxYield for the past 13 years and I look forward to working with MaxYield’s next CEO as we begin the transition in July.”

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

MaxYield Cooperative Holds Annual Meeting by Mail

WEST BEND, IA – MaxYield Cooperative® recently held its 106th annual meeting. Due to continuing COVID-19 restrictions, this year’s meeting and director elections were conducted by mail. During MaxYield’s regular board meeting Wednesday, December 9, nominating committee member Rich Harves from Dickens, IA, reviewed the ballots and announced the results of the election to the board of directors.

Reelected by the membership to MaxYield’s board were Jim Black of Algona in MaxYield’s east region, David Garrelts from Emmetsburg in the central region and Barry Anderson of Greenville in the west region. They will each serve a three-year term. The minutes of MaxYield’s 2019 annual meeting were also approved by the membership.

During the December board meeting, Howard Haas was nominated by the board to continue serving as chairman. David Garrelts and Eric Marchand will continue to serve as vice chairman and secretary/treasurer, respectively.

At the conclusion of MaxYield’s fiscal year ending July 31, 2020, the directors reviewed and approved the cooperative’s financial audit. Each Class A (voting) member received a summary of MaxYield’s financial report in their annual meeting packet that was mailed in November.

MaxYield CEO Keith Heim says that the cooperative had positive local and total savings to report. “Each year presents challenges and opportunities and Fiscal 2020 was no different. I am especially proud of how our team performed and showed grit and resiliency during this COVID-19 pandemic. MaxYield is a solution’s provider and I appreciate the solutions our team brings to our members and clients every day. We also appreciate the support of our members as we transitioned to an annual meeting conducted by mail this year.”

MaxYield Cooperative reported Local Savings from Operations for the 2019-2020 fiscal year of $1,512,243 and pre-tax Total Savings for the cooperative totaled $8.6 million.

“In Fiscal 2020, we achieved the second best total revenue in company history”, Heim said. “Most all revenue areas showed consistency with the past year and remain on upward trend lines. Some areas of note include the second best drying revenue year, solid total energy and feed margins, strong total seed margins and exceptional soybean margins.”

The MaxYield board approved using a portion of this year’s available Section 199A tax deduction internally to mitigate the cooperative’s tax obligation. Heim added that the unused Section 199A tax deduction amount of approximately $1.4 million will be passed through to members for possible use on their individual tax returns.

Heim said that the cooperative maintains a solid balance sheet. “Term debt was reduced by approximately $4.0 million. We maintained adequate working capital levels while spending approximately $13 million on capital expenditures during the fiscal year.”

Member’s equity increased by about $2.65 million in 2020, noted Heim. “MaxYield once again increased retained savings, which now totals nearly $67 million as compared to 1997 when retained savings were ($122,242). The retained savings comparison is a good perspective of the financial improvement at MaxYield over the past 23 years.”

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Three Principles Guide MaxYield’s Board

By Howard Haas, MaxYield Cooperative Board Chairman

If profit is a measure of success, MaxYield Cooperative is succeeding. In fiscal year 2020, we achieved the second-best total revenue in company history.

MaxYield’s local savings from operations for the 2019-2020 fiscal year (which ended July 31) totaled $1,512,243. Pre-tax total savings reached $8.6 million. A lot of those savings have come from AGP, CoBank and Land O’Lakes.

Your cooperative remains in solid financial shape, in part because we live within our means. MaxYield’s directors and leaders take a balanced approach to three key areas of financial management, including;

1.) investing in property, plant and equipment, 2.) timely retirement of bank debt and 3.) retiring some MaxYield equity each year. We achieved this balanced approach again in fiscal year 2020.

As a farmer, the financial security of the company is the priority I’m most concerned about. MaxYield’s financial strength means I don’t have to worry about pre-paying for fertilizer or using deferred contracts.

As a director, however, making decisions to fit this balanced approach isn’t always easy. There aren’t unlimited funds or time each year to accomplish everything we’d like. It’s the same on a farm. Have you ever installed a staircase on your grain bins? I want to have steps installed on my bins, but it’s hard to find crews who have the time to do this and it can be a costly upgrade.

Making sure the right resources are in place when you need them, both on the farm and at MaxYield, requires a lot of strategic decision-making. As we try to meet needs across the company, we use a framework to help guide the board’s decision-making process.

Here are three principles the MaxYield board uses to help make our decision-making process easier and more effective:

  1. CONSULT WITH PEOPLE YOU TRUST

The MaxYield board values input from the co-op’s leaders as we decide where to allocate funds. We also welcome insights from other trusted partners in the industry as we try to do what’s right for the company and MaxYield’s members and clients.

  1. BE WILLING TO LOOK AT THINGS IN A DIFFERENT WAY

If MaxYield is looking into upgrading its grain facilities, for example, efficiency is sometimes the biggest consideration. In other cases, safety is a key driver.

We also understand that our members may have different needs worth considering. While some clients want efficient service and facilities above all else, other clients view equity retirement as a top priority. I’m pleased that MaxYield continues to pay off estates. We’ve also opened another discounted equity offering, plus we’re passing along Section 199A tax benefits to you.

  1. GET INVOLVED

If your priorities are different from mine or my fellow MaxYield directors, you need to let us know. We want to hear from you. Better yet, get involved. Run for the board. We know there are skilled, knowledgeable people out there who can provide tremendous leadership on MaxYield’s board.

Thanks for your continued support of MaxYield. We appreciate your business and will continue to look for solutions that will help keep your cooperative strong, now and into the future.•

 

Running for the MaxYield Cooperative Board of Directors

Democratic member control isn’t just a cooperative principle; it guides everything we do at MaxYield Cooperative. Our members control this business by deciding how it’s run and who leads it.

MaxYield is guided by a nine-member board of directors. The cooperative utilizes three board districts (east region, central region and west region) so members in each geographic area have fair representation on the board. One director is elected each year from each district.

“The governance process is one of the most important components of your cooperative’s success,” said Howard Hass, MaxYield board chairman. “If you’d like to run for the board in 2021, we encourage you to get involved.”

LEARN MORE

MaxYield welcomes new candidates to run for the board. For more details, contact Chad Meyer, client relations/communications leader at MaxYield, at 515-200-5115, or cmeyer@maxyieldcooperative.com.

What’s the Biggest Secret to Success?

By Keith Heim, CEO, MaxYield Cooperative

Think of the last time you stopped by a MaxYield location. Did our team members greet you? Were they friendly? Were they able to answer your questions, or find the information needed to answer them?

These things may seem basic, but they build the foundation that allows your cooperative to succeed. That’s why we continue to invest in leadership and training initiatives across the company so we can serve you effectively.

Focusing on fundamentals like this is one of the biggest secrets to success in business. It also translates into solid financial returns that keeps your cooperative strong.

MaxYield has achieved consistent earnings in our past three fiscal years. I’m especially proud of how our team has performed during this COVID-19 pandemic, showing grit, resiliency and a renewed focus on the fundamentals to meet your needs.

In fiscal year 2020, we achieved the second-best total revenue in company history. MaxYield’s local savings from operations for the 2019-2020 fiscal year (which ended July 31) totaled $1,512,243. Pre-tax total savings reached $8.6 million. Nearly all revenue areas showed consistency with the prior year and continue to trend upwards. Areas of note include:

  • Our second-best drying revenue year
  • Solid total energy and feed margins
  • Strong total seed margins
  • Exceptional soybean margins

All this equates to a solid balance sheet. We also reduced term debt by approximately $4 million, maintained adequate working capital and invested approximately $13 million on capital expenditures during the fiscal year—well above what we normally invest.

In addition to routine upgrades, we’ve built one new grain bin at Belmond and one in Britt. We’ve also added a new 750,000-bushel bin and other equipment to modernize the grain complex at Klemme. These investments reflect a key business fundamental: if you’re not investing in your company, you’re going backwards.

GROWING MEMBERS’ EQUITY, RETAINED SAVINGS

All fits into MaxYield’s balanced approach to three key areas, including 1.) investing in property, plant and equipment, 2.) timely retirement of bank debt and 3.) retiring some MaxYield equity each year. We achieved this balanced approach again in fiscal year 2020.

Members’ equity and retained savings both grew in fiscal 2020. Member’s equity increased by about $2.65 million in fiscal year 2020. Retained savings now total nearly $67 million, compared to 1997 retained savings of ($122,242)—a dramatic increase in 23 years.

Completed 750,000-bu. bin in Belmond.

This shows you need to have business fundamentals in place long before hard times hit, so you can keep building your balance sheet. This allows you to focus on strategic, long-term decisions, rather than being held captive to short-term, quarterly, knee-jerk reactions.

PUTTING MONEY BACK IN YOUR POCKET

The MaxYield board has approved using a portion of this year’s available Section 199A tax deduction internally to mitigate the cooperative’s tax obligation. The unused Section 199A tax deduction amount (approximately $1.4 million) will be passed through to you, our members, for possible use on your individual tax returns. This is the same opportunity we offered in 2019.

Your MaxYield board of directors also reviews estate requests monthly. We paid approximately $128,000 to estates in fiscal year 2020.

During the board’s August 2020 meeting, the directors approved the distribution of a portion of allocated equities from 1999, totaling approximately $108,000. The board also approved making $500,000 available for a seventh discounted equity offering. The three stock groups for the discounted equity offering will remain the same as last year.

The notable change involves the percentages offered for each stock group:

  • Group 2 is raised from 65% to 80%.
  • Group 3 is raised from55% to 65%.
  • Group 4 is raised from 45% to 50%.

Stockholders will have until end of January 2021 to decide if they want to participate in this discounted equity offering. If you haven’t received a letter in the mail regarding this, contact your nearest MaxYield location.

THERE IS NO COMPROMISE ON PROVEN FUNDAMENTALS

The results of fiscal year 2020 show that although life is full of compromises, there is no compromise on proven business fundamentals. That’s why MaxYield embraces certain non-negotiables, including integrity, client focus, safety, professionalism, empowerment, accountability and teamwork.

Through our leadership training, we’ve discovered that it’s easy to assume team members know how to do something when they don’t, or they don’t realize they’re empowered to do a certain job. We want our team members to be comfortable in their roles and be good at what they do. That’s why we set expectations for our team members and then mentor them across the finish line so they can serve you effectively.

Ultimately, there are no secrets to keeping MaxYield strong. Get the fundamentals down, and the level of everything you do will rise. Thanks for being part of MaxYield’s success.

Brave the Shave: Brian Morey Helps Raise Nearly $5,000 for Children’s Cancer Center

Brian Morey usually doesn’t get a haircut more than once or twice a year. Saying his hair is “thick” is an understatement—although you’d never know it if you saw him after the 4th of July this past summer.

“My buddy Lennie Carkhuff—we call him Bear—is battling pancreatic and liver cancer,” said Morey, a MaxYield Cooperative truck driver from Mallard who jokes he’s a “commodity relocation specialist.” “I said if our friends could raise $1,000 or more to fight cancer, I’d let Bear shave my head.”

The big moment came during A.B.A.T.E. of Iowa’s 2020 Freedom Rally near Algona. When the shears to shave Morey’s head during the opening ceremony didn’t arrive on time, Morey’s friends rustled up a cattle trimmer and handed it to Bear.

“It was terrible,” Morey said of the haircut itself. “The good thing is that we were able to donate $4,999 to the cancer center at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital in Iowa City.”

Here are five other things you may not know about Morey, who has worked for MaxYield for 30 years:

  1. MOREY STAYS CLOSE TO HIS FARM ROOTS

Morey grew up 5 miles west of West Bend, where his family raised hogs, cattle, corn and soybeans. Morey enjoyed working outside and fixing everything from bicycles to motorcycles, tractors and trucks. “I would have liked to have been a farmer but I didn’t have that opportunity,” said Morey, 1984 graduate of West Bend High School. He studied automotive repair at Iowa Lakes Community College. Jobs were tough to come by in rural Iowa during those Farm Crisis years. After a brief stint working at a packing plant in Storm Lake, Morey worked with with Bleuer Construction for four years before landing a job at West Bend Elevator Company in 1990. “I’ve enjoyed getting to build a career in my hometown,” he said.

  1. WORKING AT THE CO-OP OFFERS OPPORTUNITY

When Morey started working at the co-op in West Bend, he was in the grain division. He also spent 20 weeks a year working in the soybean processing plant. “We sold fish cake to places in Louisiana,” said Morey, who noted that a big customer included the Landry family, who rose to fame through the popular “Swamp People” series on the History Channel. Today, Morey hauls grain and fertilizer in MaxYield’s central region in the spring and fall. He also hauls equipment like Trackmobiles, as needed. “You tell me what you want done, and I’ll give you the best service I can.”

  1. MOREY LIKES HIS WIDE-OPEN SPACES

Morey enjoys spending time outdoors, from deer hunting to motorcycling. He started riding a Yahama 50 at age 5. He grew up to be a Honda guy but says his “banker” (his wife, Melissa) wanted him to drive a Harley-Davidson. “It has cruise control,” explained Melissa, speaking of the couple’s Ultra Classic. The couple sometimes travels with a small group of other riders. They also enjoy longer rides, including a late summer 2020 trip to Pikes Peak State Park near McGregor, Iowa. “All the twists and turns of the road by the Mississippi River are interesting,” Morey said. “We like seeing the woods and hills.”

  1. MOREY AND HIS FAMILY ARE ACTIVE IN A.B.A.T.E.

Morey (right) with Bear at the 2020 A.B.A.T.E. Freedom Rally in Algona.

Morey joined A Brotherhood Aimed Towards Education (A.B.A.T.E.) after attending the group’s Freedom Rally near Algona in 2002. “This is a political and educational organization and supports all freedoms for U.S. citizens,” Morey said. “We believe you should have choices, rather than the government telling you what to do.” A.B.A.T.E. offers many educational programs related to motorcycle riding, including Share the Road, which is taught in every drivers’ education program in Iowa, a statewide motorcycle-rider education program, a returning rider class (“to break you of your bad habits,” Morey said), and a new trike class. “A lot of people buy the wrong bike, just because it looks cool or they want to keep up with the Jones,” Morey said. “We want everyone to enjoy the ride, but do it safely.”

  1. GIVING BACK IS IMPORTANT

Morey has served on the maintenance crew at Freedom Park northeast of Algona since 2009. As soon as the snow melts, he and his fellow volunteers start getting the park ready for the July 4th Freedom Rally. He and his fellow A.B.A.T.E. members also hold a “toy run” motorcycle ride in September to purchase toys for under-privileged kids in a 10-county area of northern Iowa. “We get donations from businesses, plus each person on the run pays $10 and donates a new, unwrapped toy,” said Morey, who noted the event also includes an auction. Depending on the year, the group has raised $7,000 to $20,000 to buy toys. The Moreys also support Bikes for Tykes, which donates bicycles to kids in Webster, Wright, Hamilton and Humboldt counties for Christmas. “It’s nice to be able to give back to more people,” Morey said.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Brian and his wife, Melissa, have been married 32 years and have two grown children.

 

Facility Investments Pay Off at MaxYield

If you delivered grain this fall in MaxYield Cooperative’s east region, you probably noticed some big changes. We built one new 750,000-bushel grain bin at Belmond and one 750,000-bushel grain bin in Britt.

Britt

Belmond

Belmond’s bin upgrade has worked well, according to Frank Uhde, MaxYield’s east area leader. “The Belmond team received almost 600,000 bushel of soybeans at our Belmond west location. This was the first time we have used the west elevator for soybeans. Having beans on this side will allow us the ability to load a soybean train.”

Uhde was also very complimentary of the new 750,000-bushel grain bin and other facility improvements at Britt. “The new bin in Britt helped significantly decrease the amount of grain transfers during harvest and it also improved how fast we could take grain. The new PLC control system and improvements at the Britt scale have been great upgrades and has helped with both receiving and loading out grain.”

The biggest project included our $4.5 million investment at Klemme. The project included 750,000-bushel bin, a 4,000-bushel-per-hour grain dryer, wet-corn holding capacity, overhead truck load-out capability and all the infrastructure needed to complete the project.

Klemme

“Harvest hit us before Klemme’s upgrades were fully operational,” said Uhde. “We are grateful for our members and clients support this fall as we worked through a couple early challenges. Klemme has some more work to finish before being complete, but we will get it completed soon. With what we have seen this far, Klemme’s grain receiving will be a force to reckon with.

Klemme received over 151,000 bushels one of the days’ during harvest. This is almost double their best grain receiving day in the past.”

“We made these investments to handle your grain a lot faster and help you get back to the field quickly during harvest,” said Ben Buie, grain team leader at MaxYield. These much-needed improvements will benefit area farmers for generations to come.”

If you don’t farm in the east region, don’t think MaxYield has overlooked you. MaxYield’s directors and leadership teams understand the importance of continually improving facilities and equipment throughout the company.

“We’re certainly not done investing in the cooperative’s assets,” Buie said. “We plan to keep expanding and improving our facilities throughout the company to serve you more efficiently.”

Annual Meeting – UPDATE

Last week all Class A (voting) members of MaxYield Cooperative were sent their NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING. As noted in the mailing, the in-person portion of the Annual Meeting will not be held and the financial report and director election will be conducted by mail.

For your reference, below is the letter that was sent to voting members. Please mail all ballots in the return envelope marked “BALLOT” to MaxYield’s corporate office.  We must receive your ballot by the close of business on December 8, 2020.

 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING

Dear MaxYield Cooperative Member:

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the in-person portion of MaxYield Cooperative’s Annual Meeting will not be held. Your cooperative’s July 31, 2020 financial report and the director election will be conducted by mail.

The following is included in this Notice of Annual Meeting packet:

  • Financial Statements. A condensed financial statement on the fiscal year of operation for MaxYield Cooperative, which concluded July 31, 2020, is enclosed. Detailed printed or electronic financial reports are available at any MaxYield location or by contacting Bridgett Southard or Doug Miller at our corporate office at 515-200-5115.
  • Official Board of Directors ballot. Also included are board candidate profiles and the ballot return envelope.
  • Minutes of last year’s annual meeting, included for your review and approval.

The stockholders are requested to:

  • Fill certain positions on the cooperative’s Board of Directors
  • Approve the minutes of last year’s board meeting

Enclosed is the official Ballot for purpose of the above. With respect to the positions on the Board of Directors, please mark one candidate for each of the open positions. To approve last year’s annual meeting minutes, please mark “YES.” Your ballot can be returned in the enclosed postage paid envelope.

Counting of the ballots will take place on Wednesday, December 9, 2020. A member of the nominating committee and/or a Class A (voting) member of MaxYield Cooperative will count the ballots. We must receive your ballot by the close of business on December 8, 2020.

Do not hesitate to contact your board of directors or nearest location with any questions regarding the annual meeting or the financial report of MaxYield Cooperative. Results from the director election will be posted to www.maxyieldcoop.com and www.fromthefield.com.

We appreciate your support of MaxYield Cooperative!

Cooperatively yours;

Howard Haas                                                                 Keith Heim
Board Chairman                                                            CEO