December 10, 2019

MaxYield Cooperative Announces Positive Fiscal 2019 Results

WEST BEND, IA, – MaxYield Cooperative® recently announced its fiscal results, for the year ending July 31, 2019. The board of directors for MaxYield reviewed and approved the financial audit at their board meeting, held August 22.

MaxYield CEO Keith Heim stated that the cooperative had positive local and total savings to report. “The recently completed fiscal year had reduced corn and soybean bushels in the fall of 2018, compared to recent years and reduced grain drying revenue. That said, the reduced bushels and drying revenue were more than offset by strong margins in most all product areas and disciplined expense control across the cooperative.”

In addition to recent upgrades in Algona and Greenville, MaxYield recently announced the board of director’s approval to build new grain storage in Belmond and Britt in 2020, with each of the bins totaling 725,000 bushels. Heim went on to say that MaxYield’s board of directors continues to place strong emphasis on upgrading and improving facilities, equipment and rolling stock.

MaxYield Cooperative’s Local Savings from Operations for the 2018-2019 fiscal year were $1,790,071 and pre-tax Total Savings for the cooperative totaled $7.4 million.

Heim said that the cooperative’s balance sheet remains very strong. “We continue to build our already solid balance sheet. Term debt was reduced by over $4.8 million, member’s equity increased and we added $2.5 million to working capital in 2019, which is up by over $5.5 million over the past two fiscal years. MaxYield also increased retained savings, which now totals nearly $59 million. In 1997, retained savings at MaxYield were ($122,242), so you can see we continue to make significant progress in strengthening the financial position of MaxYield. Retained savings is a good benchmark putting into perspective the financial improvements here over the past 22 years,” he added.

The cooperative’s annual meeting is December 12, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. at the Kossuth County Ag & Motorsports Museum, located in Algona, IA.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 25 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for three Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

 

 

 

“This is my dream job.” | Colby Kraninger’s Agronomy Specialist Trainee Story

Having a job and having a career you love are two very different things- Colby Kraninger, an agronomy specialist trainee at MaxYield Cooperative, prefers the latter. That’s why, after working for MaxYield Cooperative part-time and as an intern, he returned for a full-time opportunity in the agronomy department. A 2014 Okoboji High School and 2019 Iowa State University graduate, the Milford-native built his post-secondary plans around the goal of working for MaxYield Cooperative. “[While at North Iowa Area Community College] I worked in grain operations [for MaxYield Cooperative in Fostoria]- I wanted to be a grain originator at the time. I eventually realized I didn’t want to pursue a career in [grain]. When I graduated from NIACC, I realized I wanted to become an agronomist after working for MaxYield so I decided to continue my education at Iowa State.” In addition to working at the Fostoria location, he has worked in the dry fertilizer facility at Emmetsburg, agronomy operations in Dickens, soil sampling and crop scouting with SciMax, and most recently as an agronomy sales intern in the summer of 2018.

Coming off his time at NIACC and MaxYield, the agronomy major at Iowa State just felt like the right fit to Colby. “I like talking to people, and I feel like growers can trust me. Since I never had the opportunity to farm myself, I want to contribute to the industry by helping others improve their operations. I’ve just dreamed of being around agriculture my entire life.”

Since starting in his new trainee role, Colby has taken on a variety of responsibilities, from delivering seed to making crop protection recommendations and everything in between. His favorite part of his position, however, is the client interaction. “It’s the number one part of my job- I enjoy being able to use what I learned at Iowa State to help people.”

To help facilitate the transition from college to the full-time workforce, all trainees at MaxYield Cooperative are given a mentor to provide guidance and knowledge. Colby has two. “My mentors are Justin Zwiefel (Agronomy Specialist, Mallard) and Tom Evans (Agronomy Specialist, Superior). If it wasn’t for them I would be directionless in terms of my career. They help keep me on track and show me how to use our agronomy software, how to provide a good [crop protection and nutrient] recommendation, and other important skills.”

Other team members have also helped make Colby’s time at MaxYield great. He especially enjoys his co-workers at the Mallard Location. “The people I work with are really nice- there were two weeks in a row where we just took turns buying each other lunch. We joke around and like to have a good time, and everyone treats each other very well.”

It’s a pretty incredible feeling to wake up and be excited for what lies ahead. For Colby, that happens every day. “This career is pretty exciting. Everyday there’s something to look forward to. In the future, I hope to provide trust to [my] future clients and be equipped to provide them with solutions. Service is key.”

There’s a lot of agronomy sales opportunities out there for new college graduates, but Colby can recommend the MaxYield agronomy specialist trainee role with confidence. “If someone was looking for an agronomy position at MaxYield, I would highly recommend [the agronomy specialist trainee role]. The mentor program is great, and there’s a lot of opportunity to learn and pick up on things while you are starting you’re career which is really comforting. Your questions are always answered by team members in a polite way, and if you have a client question you can’t answer, there’s plenty of resources within the company that are only a phone call away.”

Can you see yourself doing what Colby does? We are hiring an additional Agronomy Specialist Trainee! Seeking a December 2019 graduate from a 2-year or 4-year school with a degree in agronomy, ag business, ag studies, or a related area. For more information or to apply click here or contact Chad Meyer at cmeyer@maxyieldcooperative.com. *Iowa State students: Find us on CyHire!*

Logue finds answers, $2,500 feature win at MaxYield Seed SportMod Nationals

Johnathon Logue won the IMCA MaxYield Seed SportMod Nationals for a second time on June 25, earning $2,500 for the main event victory. Pictured with Logue is Matt Keel, MaxYield Seed’s Solutions Specialist in the East Region.

By Bill Martin, IMCA

BRITT, Iowa (June 25) – One win in his first 19 starts of the season had Johnathon Logue looking for answers.

He found them Tuesday night at Hancock County Speedway’s MaxYield Seed SportMod Nationals.

Logue won his heat, the dash and the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod main event, earning $2,700 in all for his efforts.

“My car was very, very good,” said Logue, whose one previous victory this year had also been at Britt, on June 7. “It seems like we’ve been on the trouble bus with it all season. To be able to run as well as we did made it a fun night.”

Brayton Carter, Jared Boumeester, Jake McBirnie and Jim Chisholm completed the top five across the stripe in the $2,500 to win feature. Forty-seven drivers from five states were entered.

“So many good drivers come to this event every year. I’ve always loved coming up here,” said Logue, also the SportMod Nationals winner in 2016. “The amount of talent in this division is unbelievable.”

Logue pocketed $200 for winning the DeKalb Asgrow dash, earning the pole start in the main event as well.

After cautions on laps two and four, the rest of the 30-lap feature ran green.

“Jared (Boumeester) challenged on lap 10 and that told me I’d better step up my game,” Logue said. “I wasn’t sure who was moving through the field but the laps really clicked off. It felt like we got to halfway, then I was taking the white flag.”

“I thought ‘Holy cow, we’re going to win this thing.’ I just made sure I hit my marks on the last lap.”

Logue’s lead was scored at two seconds with five laps left and at just more than a second and a half at the finish.

Jamie Anderson started last in the field of 24, finished 12th and earned the $100 LG Seeds hard charger award,

Austin Wolf was the IMCA Modified winner. Kelly Shryock paced the IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and Drew Barglof won the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock main.

The MaxYield Seed SportMod Nationals had been postponed a week because of inclement weather.

Feature results – 1. Johnathon Logue; 2. Brayton Carter; 3. Jared Boumeester; 4. Jake McBirnie; 5. Jim Chisholm; 6. Doug Smith; 7. Colby Fett; 8. Cody Thompson; 9. Nate Whitehurst; 10. George Nordman; 11. Doug Cook; 12. Jamie Anderson; 13. Josh Appel; 14. Dallas Nutt; 15. Jake Sachau; 16. Cam Reimers; 17. Alec Fett; 18. Carter VanDenBerg; 19. Matt Looft; 20. Jeff Carter; 21. Mathew Hanson; 22. Ronald Hults; 23. Carter Shumski; 24. Dakota Sproul.

Find Out How to Grow 80-100 Bushel Soybeans!

Find out what it takes to grow 80-100 bushel soybeans!

Join us for our 80-100 bushel soybean meeting.

Dan Bjorklund, MaxYield Seed Team Leader, will be presenting high-yield management strategies to consider this growing season.

Monday, March 18th
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

MaxYield’s Tire & Auto Service Center – Meeting Room

310 4th Ave. NE
West Bend, IA

Join us for pie and coffee and high-yield management strategies!

Contact your MaxYield agronomy specialist or Mike Hommez at 712-260-4491, mhommez@maxyieldseed.com for more information

Looking for Financing Options?

In these times of tight margins, it pays to assess all your options, especially when it comes to financing inputs for the 2019 crop.

MaxYield’s options include:

  • In-house financing. MaxYield offers delayed-price diesel, summer-fill liquid propane (LP) and terms on fall and spring inputs. Fall inputs can be picked up and applied before payment is due January 20. Spring inputs can be paid for by July 20. “If you pay early, you can also earn discounts,” Post noted. Pre-paid dollars lock in the best prices. “However, our in-house financing offers you a longer time period to pay for some of your big-ticket items,” Post said.
  • John Deere Financial. You can also access financing options through John Deere Financial, which has been a trusted partner at MaxYield for years. “Our relationships with national companies allow us to pass along low rates,” said Chad Hefel, Iowa sales manager for John Deere Financial. “Along with saving money, you can access an unsecured line of credit to help preserve your cash flow on your operating line of credit.”

You can apply for credit or request a credit increase for a John Deere Financial account through the MaxYield Seed website (www.maxyieldseed.com). Getting your application in sooner rather than later is smart, Post noted. “This provides the most flexibility in obtaining the crop inputs you need now and then pay after harvest.”

  • Rabo AgriFinance. MaxYield also has arrangements with Rabo AgriFinance, a global leader in agriculture financing. “This can be the right option for some people,” said Post, who encourages you to visit with your local MaxYield agronomist or seed team specialist to explore your options.

How does 0% financing sound?

Maybe you’re thinking, “I have enough money to make my purchases without a loan. Why should I look into financing?”

There are still some 0% financing deals out there, Post said. “These deals allow opportunities to utilize cash elsewhere. In any case, we encourage you to assess which solutions fit your business, and we look forward to working with you.”

“We provide you choices,” said Susan Post, chief financial officer for MaxYield Cooperative. “We encourage you to do the math, talk to financial professionals like your banker and tax advisor to assess cash flow needs, and determine the solution that fits your operation.”

Maintaining Trust Through Changing Times

Financing options don’t just affect your business. They also impact your cooperative.

“Times have changed,” said Susan Post, chief financial officer at MaxYield Cooperative. “Vendors are asking us for prepaid money sooner and are paying rebates back later in order to stretch the time value of money to their benefit.”

MaxYield Cooperative Announces Fiscal 2018 Results

WEST BEND, IA, – MaxYield Cooperative® recently announced its fiscal results, for the year ending July 31, 2018. The board of directors for MaxYield reviewed and approved the financial audit at their board meeting, held August 23.

“The recently completed year-end showed solid earnings and financial results in a continued challenging agricultural environment,” stated MaxYield CEO Keith Heim. “We had a strong fall 2017 season and even with a very difficult spring, in which some crop inputs and nutrients were simply not applied, seed, crop nutrient and crop protection margins in total were higher than the previous fiscal year.”

Heim added that other noteworthy accomplishments included strong grain drying revenues, increased propane gallons, solid energy margins, plus increased transportation, SciMax Solutions and feed revenues. “Our emphasis on expense control, plus improved grain margins in 2018 also helped us achieve strong fiscal results,” he added.

MaxYield Cooperative’s Local Savings from Operations for the 2017-2018 fiscal year were $1,593,687, and pre-tax Total Savings for the cooperative totaled nearly $4.9 million.

Heim noted that the cooperative continues to build its balance sheet. “This is arguably the strongest balance sheet in our cooperative’s history. Term debt was reduced by $4.4 million, member’s equity increased and we added $3.0 million to working capital in 2018. MaxYield also increased retained savings, which now totals nearly $52 million. In 1997, retained savings were ($122,242), so you can see we continue to make significant progress in strengthening the financial position of MaxYield. We have been and will continue to focus on enhancing revenue and decreasing expenses in this tight economic environment,” he added.

The cooperative’s annual meeting is December 10, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at the Britt Community Center, located in Britt, IA.

About MaxYield Cooperative

MaxYield Cooperative is a member-owned, diversified agricultural cooperative founded in 1915 and is headquartered in West Bend, IA. The cooperative has 24 locations and three Cenex convenience stores in Iowa. MaxYield also provides grain origination and accounting services for two Iowa feed mills. For more information, visit MaxYield online at www.MaxYieldCoop.com and www.FromTheField.com.

Dayton Brugman, crop scouting/soil sampling intern

In some ways, interning at MaxYield was like coming home for Dayton Brugman. Not only was he back in northwest Iowa close to his hometown, but his internship has allowed him to learn even more about local agriculture.

“I’ve grown up around MaxYield and heard about how good their internships are,” said Brugman, 19, a 2017 Clay Central Everly High School graduate who is studying ag business at Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) in Ankeny. “I worked in Dickens at the chemical facility and at the seed warehouse in Spencer this spring. Treating seed and learning about the different types of seed really sparked my interest in agronomy.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I grew up on a corn and soybean farm near Peterson, so ag has been part of my life from the beginning. I like it and try to stay connected to farming no matter where I’m at. In the fall, I work for a farmer near Ankeny and run the combine for him.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield internship?

A: I got an early start on my internship since I started here in March 2018. With a MaxYield internship you learn the foundations of agronomy from the roots up. I’ve learned a lot by participating in MaxYield’s plot days, where you learn from MaxYield’s team and speakers from WinField.

I was based out of Everly but had the chance to go all over MaxYield’s trade territory. I got into soil sampling, crop scouting and tissue sampling. While there’s a push on getting the work done, MaxYield always emphasizes learning. It’s not just busy work. The team is also fun to work with.

I’d definitely recommend a MaxYield internship. It’s so much different than writing answers on a test at college. It’s a lot easier to grasp these concepts in the field.

Q: How have you benefited by having Mason Mentink as your mentor at MaxYield?

A: Mason is very knowledgeable about agronomy. He’s always fun to talk to and is good with the clients. His ability to communicate with them is impressive because he knows how to adapt to different personalities. He knows what each client expects of MaxYield and works hard to serve them.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  After I graduate from DMACC, I plan to transfer to ISU in the fall of 2019. I’m undecided about what I want to do at ISU and in my career, but my MaxYield internship is helping me find out what interests me. I know I want to stay in Iowa after college. I’d like to come back to northwest Iowa, because I’m interested in production ag and running our family’s farm.

Editor’s note: Brugman appreciated the chance to have an internship close to home, since he raises show pigs. These pigs have won top honors at the Clay County Fair and have competed in shows including the Iowa State Fair, the World Pork Expo and the Arizona National in Phoenix. Raising pigs is a family affair for Brugman, his parents (Dan and Darcy), his younger brother, Davin, and his younger sister, Dalayna. In his free time, Brugman also enjoys watching sports, including the Minnesota Vikings, ISU men’s basketball and the Washington Capitals ice hockey team. He’s also a fan of the Stanley Cup finals.

Cody Tjossem, crop scouting/soil sampling intern

Cody Tjossem doesn’t settle for average. Instead of just one major, he decided to pursue two majors at ISU.

“I looked into accounting but decided that was kind of boring,” said Tjossem, 19, a sophomore who is majoring in ag business and supply chain management. “I was more interested in business and chose supply chain management because I like how it’s focused on doing things as efficiently as possible.”

When it was time to look for a summer internship, this ambitious, 2017 South O’Brien High School graduate was already familiar with MaxYield. “My brother, Brian, used to be an applicator for MaxYield, and he always had great things to say about the company,” said Tjossem, who visited with the MaxYield team at the ISU College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Career Day.

The more he learned about MaxYield, the more he liked the internship program and MaxYield’s core values. “Going into this, I wanted to be able to say I worked hard and got lots of experience here,” Tjossem said. “It’s important to get involved as much as you can, especially leadership positions, and get a lot of life experience.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: My parents, Vernon and De Ann Tjossem, farm near Sutherland and Royal and raise corn and soybeans. I like growing things and enjoy making new things. That’s what a lot of farming is. You put a seed in the ground and see if you can grow it into a good yield.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield internship?

A: While it’s hard to stay busy at some agronomy internships, there’s lots of hands-on training in the field at MaxYield. To actually be able to see and touch the things you’re learning about is great, because it’s nothing like just reading a textbook.

We do tissue sampling early in the week, soil sampling and crop scouting. I also want to learn more about machinery and equipment, and you need a strong base in agronomy to make the most of technology. MaxYield’s team members are always willing to help me learn.

I know the work we’re doing matters because MaxYield’s clients want us to help them learn how to grow better crops.

Q: How have you benefited by having Brian Cable and Megan Phelan as your mentors at MaxYield?

A: Brian is very personable and has introduced me to clients and the various MaxYield team members in the area. This made me feel welcome at MaxYield. I’ve also appreciated all the hands-on experience Megan has given me with tissue sampling and other projects. She’s a good teacher.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I’d prefer to stay in Iowa, but I’ll go where the jobs are.

 Editor’s note: Tjossem likes to be outside, spending time with family and friends, golfing and boating at the lake. He’s involved in ISU’s Ag Business Club, which invites guest speakers to campus to share their stories of business ownership and offer tips on how to succeed in business.

Jason Hinkeldey, crop scouting/soil sampling intern

When he was looking for a summer internship, Jason Hinkeldey didn’t have to look too far from home.

“MaxYield has a good reputation,” said Hinkeldey, 19, a sophomore at South Dakota State University who is majoring in ag business with a minor in agronomy and agricultural marketing.

He became even more confident after he watched YouTube videos of previous MaxYield interns and read their stories. “I knew I’d learn a lot with a MaxYield internship.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I grew up on a row-crop farm near Alta, Iowa, and want to go into production agriculture.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield internship?

A: It has been quite a trying year due to the weather, but that has also helped me learn a lot about agronomy. My goal for my MaxYield internship has been to gain more knowledge about variable-rate planting and precision ag. I enjoyed going to MaxYield’s test plot near Algona, where we learned about hybrid selection, crop growth staging, weed identification and nutrient deficiencies in plants. Dan Bjorkland, MaxYield’s seed team leader, is a wealth of knowledge.

I learn best with hands-on experiences, because I retain more information that way. I’ve also liked getting to know the MaxYield team. They’re ready to lend a helping hand whenever you need it.

Q: How have you benefited by having Amanda Pederson and Chris Warren as your mentors at MaxYield?

A: Amanda is very knowledgeable and has taught me a lot about crop disease identification and modes of action with various crop protection products. I’ve also worked with Chris Warren with SciMax Solutions, who has taught me a lot about variable-rate technology and precision planting.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I’m a fifth-generation farmer and want to return home to farm full-time.

Editor’s note: Hinkeldey enjoys watching sports and cheers for the Iowa State University Cyclones.

Tyler Hoffman, crop scouting/soil sampling intern

You just never know where you’ll come across a great opportunity. Just ask Tyler Hoffman.

“I want to learn more about the business side of ag,” said Hoffman, 21, a junior who is majoring in ag business with a minor in agronomy at ISU. “When my mom was at a women-in-ag seminar, she talked to someone from MaxYield who encouraged me to meet with Chad Meyer at ISU’s ag career day last fall.”

Hoffman, who grew up on a farm near Graettinger, started asking his buddies what they knew about MaxYield. He checked in with Costas Hatzipavlides, a fellow ISU student who completed a soil sampling/crop scouting internship in 2017 at MaxYield.

“Costas has a lot of good things to say about MaxYield, so I decided I wanted to intern here, too,” Hoffman said.

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: I’ve been around ag my whole life. My parents, Duane and Kimberly, raise corn, soybeans, cattle and hogs near Graettinger. I also like working with growers. I can relate to them, since I grew up on a farm.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield internship?

A: I wanted to become more comfortable talking to growers and have intelligent conversations with them about their unique needs and solutions for their acres. It has helped a lot to learn the basics from soil sampling to crop scouting. This gives me the chance to talk to farmers about everything from switching maturity dates on corn to deciding what needs to be sprayed.

I also like visiting MaxYield’s test plots, where we discuss a lot of different agronomy topics. I learn new things and bounce ideas off my dad.  I’ve learned a lot more this summer through my MaxYield internship than I have in some of my ag classes at college. I appreciate this internship, because it’s hands-on. That makes it a lot easier to grasp the information I’m learning.

Q: How have you benefited by having Levi Quayle and Matt Keel as your mentors at MaxYield?

A: Levi is easy to talk to. I’ve learned a lot from him about weed identification and what crop protection products to use. I like working with Matt, too, because he’s also easy to talk to and is fun to be around.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A:  I’d like to stay in Iowa and am open to opportunities. I’ve gotten more interested in the agronomy side of the business through this internship. I’ve found that a lot of people don’t have an interest in agronomy until they have a MaxYield internship. I’m just scratching the surface with what I’ve learned this summer and want to keep learning about agronomy.

Editor’s note: When Hoffman isn’t working or studying, he enjoys working out at the gym, watching Netflix and spending time with his family and friends.