November 23, 2020

Jake Mullenix Grows Into a New Role

Jake MullenixJake Mullenix learned so much as a MaxYield grain operations intern in 2012 that he wanted to come back in 2013 to explore the agronomy side of the business.

“I had a really great experience last year,” said Mullenix, a 21-year-old Iowa State University ag business major from Bloomington, IL. “MaxYield is a great company with a bright future, and I want to be part of this.”

Q: What inspired you to study agriculture in college?

A: When I was growing up, I’d stay at my grandparents’ farm near Red Oak for two or three weeks each year. I really enjoyed working with Grandpa. By the time I finished my freshman year of high school, I knew I wanted to go into agriculture.

Q: What have you enjoyed about your MaxYield agronomy operations internship?

A: There’s always something new to do each day in agronomy. I’m based out of the Mallard location, and I helped load chemicals and fertilizer this spring. I’ve also filled anhydrous tanks. Some days I deliver products to the field and help load tender trucks. I always stay busy. I also like the flexibility of my internship. If there’s something I want to learn more about, the MaxYield team members make it happen.

Q: How have you benefited by having Ryan Stokes and Walt Reichert as your mentors at MaxYield?

A: They are easy to get along with, and they explain things thoroughly. Whenever I have any questions, I can ask Ryan or Walt. Everyone at MaxYield is friendly and helpful, and I’m glad I’ve gotten to know them.

Q: What are your career goals after graduation?

A: I don’t know exactly what direction I want my career to go after I graduate in May of 2014, but I’m definitely interested in agronomy.

 

Interesting facts about Jake:

• Jake’s dad, Will Mullenix, worked for MaxYield in years past as an agronomy specialist.

• Jake is a legacy student at Iowa State University (ISU), since his father and grandfather also studied there. Jake will be a senior when he returns to college this fall.

• Jake earns extra money at the ISU dairy farm, where he works with the livestock and helps clean the barns.

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